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The Effect of Having More Children on Women's Labour Force Participation in Korea: An Analysis Using Instrument Variables

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  • Kigon Nam

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the causal relations between having more children and women's labour force participation using Korean data. Given the strong preference for sons in Korea, variables regarding the number of daughters were used as instrument variables for having more children. The results using 1980s data showed that having a third child had a significantly positive impact on women's labour force participation in the ordinary least squares analysis, whereas the coefficient value was significantly negative in the two‐stage least squares analysis. Such results imply that, unlike in the western societies such as the USA and the UK, the ordinary least squares analysis results might underestimate the negative correlations between having more children and women's labour force participation in a developing country such as Korea.

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  • Kigon Nam, 2010. "The Effect of Having More Children on Women's Labour Force Participation in Korea: An Analysis Using Instrument Variables," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(3), pages 333-356, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:24:y:2010:i:3:p:333-356
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9914.2010.00487.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Baranowska, 2013. "The family size effects on female employment. Evidence from the “natural experiments” related to human reproduction," Working Papers 57, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    2. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak, 2016. "The Causal Effects of the Number of Children on Female Employment - Do European Institutional and Gender Conditions Matter?," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 343-367, September.

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