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Do Parental Transfers Reduce Youths' Incentives to Work?

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  • Tao Gong

Abstract

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to examine the effects that parental transfers from a family have on a youth's labor supply. The results from a fixed-effects two-stage least squares estimator suggest that: (i) parental pocket money reduces youths' incentives to work; (ii) parental allowances have a non-linear effect on hours worked; (iii) the subsample of siblings shows similar patterns that parental transfers have a negative impact on hours worked, although the magnitudes are slightly weaker than the full sample; and (iv) the response to parental transfers varies by age. Copyright 2009 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Tao Gong, 2009. "Do Parental Transfers Reduce Youths' Incentives to Work?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(4), pages 653-676, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:23:y:2009:i:4:p:653-676
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    Cited by:

    1. Angus Holford, 2015. "The labour supply effect of Education Maintenance Allowance and its implications for parental altruism," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 531-568, September.
    2. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Tue Gørgens, 2014. "Parents’ economic support of young-adult children: do socioeconomic circumstances matter?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 447-471, April.
    3. Holford, Angus, 2016. "Do parents tax their children? Teenage labour supply and financial support," ISER Working Paper Series 2016-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Bachmann, Andreas & Boes, Stefan, 2014. "Private transfers and college students’ decision to work," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 34-42.

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