IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/labour/v21y2007i2p333-359.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Exploring Job Satisfaction in Private and Public Employment: Empirical Evidence from Greece

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Demoussis
  • Nicholas Giannakopoulos

Abstract

This paper analyses subjective job satisfaction (JS) responses by employees in the public and private sectors of the Greek labour market. Panel data covering the period 1995-2001 and a random effects ordered probit model are used for estimation purposes. The results of the econometric estimation show that a substantial JS differential exists between the two sectors, in every JS domain and always in favour of public employment. A typical ordered decomposition analysis indicates that about one-third of the difference in expected JS can be explained by differences in employee characteristics and two-thirds by unobserved sector-specific inbuilt features. The comparison of wage reductions, which a representative employee will be prepared to endure in order to avoid employment in the private sector, reveals that the regularity of working schedules is appreciated more than any other facet of JS. The obtained results enhance the existing apparatus for evaluating government policies in the labour market. Copyright 2007 The Authors; Journal compilation 2007 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Demoussis & Nicholas Giannakopoulos, 2007. "Exploring Job Satisfaction in Private and Public Employment: Empirical Evidence from Greece," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(2), pages 333-359, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:21:y:2007:i:2:p:333-359
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-9914.2007.00370.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anna Cristina D'Addio & Tor Eriksson & Paul Frijters, 2007. "An analysis of the determinants of job satisfaction when individuals' baseline satisfaction levels may differ," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(19), pages 2413-2423.
    2. Skalli, Ali & Theodossiou, Ioannis & Vasileiou, Efi, 2008. "Jobs as Lancaster goods: Facets of job satisfaction and overall job satisfaction," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1906-1920, October.
    3. Luis Diaz-Serrano & Jose A. Cabral Vieira, 2005. "Low-pay higher pay and job satisfaction within the European Union: empirical evidence from fourteen countries," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n1560405, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Andries de Grip & Inge Sieben & Fred Stevens, 2009. "Are More Competent Workers More Satisfied?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(4), pages 589-607, December.
    2. Antonio Di Paolo, 2012. "(Endogenous) occupational choices and job satisfaction among recent PhD recipients: evidence from Catalonia," Working Papers XREAP2012-21, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Dec 2012.
    3. David Madden, 2010. "Gender Differences in Mental Well-Being: a Decomposition Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 99(1), pages 101-114, October.
    4. Nuno Crespo & Nádia Simões & José Castro Pinto, 2013. "Determinant factors of job quality in Europe," Working Papers Series 2 13-01, ISCTE-IUL, Business Research Unit (BRU-IUL).
    5. Lasierra, Jose Manuel & Molina, Jose Alberto & Ortega, Raquel, 2015. "Job satisfaction and motivation of public employees in Spain," MPRA Paper 64950, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Demoussis, Michael & Giannakopoulos, Nicholas, 2008. "Analysis of domain satisfactions: Evidence from a panel of Greek women," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1347-1362, August.
    7. Stefania Capecchi & Maria Iannario & Domenico Piccolo, 2012. "Modelling Job Satisfaction in AlmaLaurea Surveys," Working Papers 56, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.
    8. Tcherneva Pavlina R., 2012. "The Job Guarantee: Delivering the Benefits That Basic Income Only Promises – A Response to Guy Standing," Basic Income Studies, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 66-87, January.
    9. Zhuravleva, Tatiana, 2015. "Analysis of the Factors of Wages Differentiation in the Public and Private Sectors of the Russian Economy," Published Papers mn10, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
    10. John Gibson, 2007. "The Public Sector Pay Premium and Compensating Differentials in the New Zealand Labour Market," Working Papers in Economics 07/20, University of Waikato.
    11. Robin Zoutenbier, 2014. "The Impact of Matching Mission Preferences on Well-being at Work," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-036/I, Tinbergen Institute.
    12. Lea Sell & Bryan Cleal, 2011. "Job Satisfaction, Work Environment, and Rewards: Motivational Theory Revisited," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 25(1), pages 1-23, March.
    13. Robin Zoutenbier, 2016. "The impact of matching mission preferences on well-being at work," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 295-315, August.
    14. Natalia Danzer, 2013. "Job Satisfaction and Self-Selection into the Public or Private Sector: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," ifo Working Paper Series 169, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    15. repec:eur:ejesjr:94 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Tubadji, Annie & Gheasi, Masood & Nijkamp, Peter, 2014. "Immigrants' 'Ability' and Welfare as a Function of Cultural Diversity: Effect of Cultural Capital at Individual and Local Level," IZA Discussion Papers 8460, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:21:y:2007:i:2:p:333-359. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/csrotit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.