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Cluster Dynamics: New Evidence and Projections for Computing Services in Great Britain


  • Bernard Fingleton
  • Danilo Igliori
  • Barry Moore


This paper tests some of the main hypotheses about the importance of horizontal clusters for the growth of employment in small firms using data from Computing Services in Great Britain. In the main section of the paper, spatial econometric models are estimated controlling for supply- and demand-side conditions to isolate the effect of initial cluster intensity. The paper then projects cluster development using the fitted model, showing how clusters are likely to emerge and intensify. One aspect of the paper is the existence of a de-clustering mechanism due to congestion effects. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Inc. 2005

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  • Bernard Fingleton & Danilo Igliori & Barry Moore, 2005. "Cluster Dynamics: New Evidence and Projections for Computing Services in Great Britain," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 283-311.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:45:y:2005:i:2:p:283-311

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Guy Dumais & Glenn Ellison & Edward L. Glaeser, 2002. "Geographic Concentration As A Dynamic Process," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 193-204, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cristina Santos & Alexandre Almeida & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2008. "Searching for clusters in tourism. A quantitative methodological proposal," FEP Working Papers 293, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    2. Scorzafave, Luiz Guilherme & Soares, Milena Karla, 2009. "Income inequality and pecuniary crimes," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 40-42, July.
    3. Brian T. McCann & Timothy B. Folta, 2009. "Demand- and Supply-Side Agglomerations: Distinguishing between Fundamentally Different Manifestations of Geographic Concentration," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(3), pages 362-392, May.
    4. Danilo Camargo Igliori, 2006. "Deforestation, Growth And Agglomeration Effects: Evidence From Agriculture In The Brazilian Amazon," Anais do XXXIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 34th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 102, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    5. Elio Iannuzzi & Massimiliano Berardi, 2012. "Italian industrial districts: crisis or evolution?," World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 8(1), pages 23-36.
    6. Lin, Hui-Lin & Li, Hsiao-Yun & Yang, Chih-Hai, 2011. "Agglomeration and productivity: Firm-level evidence from China's textile industry," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 313-329, September.
    7. Peter Mayerhofer, 2005. "Structural Preconditions of City Competitiveness. Some Empirical Results for European Cities," WIFO Working Papers 260, WIFO.
    8. John I. CARRUTHERS & Michael K. HOLLAR & Gordon F. MULLIGAN, 2008. "Growth And Convergence In The Space Economy : Evidence From The United States," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 27, pages 35-60.
    9. John I. Carruthers & Gordon F. Mulligan, 2008. "A locational analysis of growth and change in American metropolitan areas," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 87(2), pages 155-171, June.

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