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A Further Understanding of Stock Distributions: The Case of Reverse Stock Splits

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  • Peterson, David R
  • Peterson, Pamela P

Abstract

In this study the authors analyze reverse stock splits and demonstrate that the total risk of returns to reverse splitting securities declines after the split, yet systematic risk remains essentially unchanged. In general, securities have negative abnormal stock returns at reverse split announcements, though smaller companies have stronger negative reactions. Companies forced to reverse split have positive wealth effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Peterson, David R & Peterson, Pamela P, 1992. "A Further Understanding of Stock Distributions: The Case of Reverse Stock Splits," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 15(3), pages 189-205, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jfnres:v:15:y:1992:i:3:p:189-205
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Grinblatt, Mark S. & Masulis, Ronald W. & Titman, Sheridan, 1984. "The valuation effects of stock splits and stock dividends," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 461-490, December.
    2. Sanger, Gary C. & Peterson, James D., 1990. "An Empirical Analysis of Common Stock Delistings," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(02), pages 261-272, June.
    3. Lakonishok, Josef & Lev, Baruch, 1987. " Stock Splits and Stock Dividends: Why, Who, and When," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(4), pages 913-932, September.
    4. Dubofsky, David A, 1991. " Volatility Increases Subsequent to NYSE and AMEX Stock Splits," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 421-431, March.
    5. Brennan, Michael J. & Copeland, Thomas E., 1988. "Stock splits, stock prices, and transaction costs," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 83-101, October.
    6. Ohlson, James A. & Penman, Stephen H., 1985. "Volatility increases subsequent to stock splits: An empirical aberration," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 251-266, June.
    7. Lamoureux, Christopher G & Poon, Percy, 1987. " The Market Reaction to Stock Splits," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(5), pages 1347-1370, December.
    8. McNichols, Maureen & Dravid, Ajay, 1990. " Stock Dividends, Stock Splits, and Signaling," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(3), pages 857-879, July.
    9. Brennan, M J & Copeland, T E, 1988. " Beta Changes around Stock Splits: A Note," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(4), pages 1009-1013, September.
    10. Dravid, Ajay R, 1987. " A Note on the Behavior of Stock Returns around Ex-dates of Stock Distributions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(1), pages 163-168, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rhee, S. Ghon & Wu, Feng, 2012. "Anything wrong with breaking a buck? An empirical evaluation of NASDAQ's $1 minimum bid price maintenance criterion," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 258-285.
    2. Claire Crutchley & Steven Swidler, 2015. "Multiple reverse stock splits (investors beware!)," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(2), pages 357-369, April.
    3. Neuhauser, Karyn L. & Thompson, Thomas H., 2016. "Survivability following reverse stock splits: What determines the fate of non-surviving firms?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 1-22.
    4. Terrence Martell & Gwendolyn Webb, 2008. "The performance of stocks that are reverse split," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 253-279, April.
    5. Kee H. Chung & Sean Yang, 2015. "Reverse Stock Splits, Institutional Holdings, and Share Value," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 44(1), pages 177-216, March.

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