IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uts/rpaper/62.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Market Structure and Stock Splits

Author

Abstract

Enhanced liquidity is one possible motivation for stock splits but empirical research frequently documents declines in liquidity following stock splits. Despite almost thirty years of inquiry, little is known about all the changes in a stock's trading activity following a stock split. We examine how liquidity measures change around more than 2,500 stock splits and find a pervasive decline in most measures. Large stock splits exhibit a more severe liquidity decline than small stock splits, especially on Nasdaq. We also examine a longer time period around stock splits and find that the differences between small and large stocks may be short-lived. Following the 1997 changes in order handling rules and reduction in tick size, liquidity declines following stock splits continue, however, the declines are not as severe on Nasdaq, suggesting the change in order handling rules may have been effective.

Suggested Citation

  • David Michayluk & Paul Kofman, 2001. "Market Structure and Stock Splits," Research Paper Series 62, Quantitative Finance Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney.
  • Handle: RePEc:uts:rpaper:62
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.qfrc.uts.edu.au/research/research_papers/rp62.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eugene F. Fama & Kenneth R. French, 2001. "Disappearing Dividends: Changing Firm Characteristics Or Lower Propensity To Pay?," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 14(1), pages 67-79.
    2. Kenneth A. Kavajecz, 1999. "A Specialist's Quoted Depth and the Limit Order Book," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(2), pages 747-771, April.
    3. Jonathan S. Moulton, 1998. "The Dynamics Of Quoted Liquidity Around Large Trades On The Nyse," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 21(3), pages 355-371, September.
    4. Huang, Roger D. & Stoll, Hans R., 1996. "Dealer versus auction markets: A paired comparison of execution costs on NASDAQ and the NYSE," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 313-357, July.
    5. Angel, James J, 1997. " Tick Size, Share Prices, and Stock Splits," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(2), pages 655-681, June.
    6. Copeland, Thomas E, 1979. "Liquidity Changes Following Stock Splits," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 34(1), pages 115-141, March.
    7. Ohlson, James A. & Penman, Stephen H., 1985. "Volatility increases subsequent to stock splits: An empirical aberration," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 251-266, June.
    8. Amihud, Yakov & Mendelson, Haim, 1986. "Asset pricing and the bid-ask spread," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 223-249, December.
    9. Barclay, Michael J. & Kandel, Eugene & Marx, Leslie M., 1998. "The Effects of Transaction Costs on Stock Prices and Trading Volume," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 130-150, April.
    10. Harold Demsetz, 1968. "The Cost of Transacting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(1), pages 33-53.
    11. Christie, William G & Harris, Jeffrey H & Schultz, Paul H, 1994. " Why Did NASDAQ Market Makers Stop Avoiding Odd-Eighth Quotes?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(5), pages 1841-1860, December.
    12. Grinblatt, Mark S. & Masulis, Ronald W. & Titman, Sheridan, 1984. "The valuation effects of stock splits and stock dividends," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 461-490, December.
    13. Dubofsky, David A, 1991. " Volatility Increases Subsequent to NYSE and AMEX Stock Splits," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 421-431, March.
    14. Jones, Charles M. & Kaul, Gautam & Lipson, Marc L., 1994. "Information, trading, and volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 127-154, August.
    15. Moulton, Jonathan S, 1998. "The Dynamics of Quoted Liquidity around Large Trades on the NYSE," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 21(3), pages 355-371, Fall.
    16. Koski, Jennifer Lynch, 1998. "Measurement Effects and the Variance of Returns after Stock Splits and Stock Dividends," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 11(1), pages 143-162.
    17. Christie, William G & Schultz, Paul H, 1994. " Why Do NASDAQ Market Makers Avoid Odd-Eighth Quotes?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(5), pages 1813-1840, December.
    18. Lee, Charles M C & Mucklow, Belinda & Ready, Mark J, 1993. "Spreads, Depths, and the Impact of Earnings Information: An Intraday Analysis," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(2), pages 345-374.
    19. Easley, David & O'Hara, Maureen & Saar, Gideon, 2001. "How Stock Splits Affect Trading: A Microstructure Approach," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(01), pages 25-51, March.
    20. Anand S. Desai & M. Nimalendran & S. Venkataraman, 1998. "Changes In Trading Activity Following Stock Splits And Their Effect On Volatility And The Adverse-Information Component Of The Bid-Ask Spread," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 21(2), pages 159-183, June.
    21. Fama, Eugene F, et al, 1969. "The Adjustment of Stock Prices to New Information," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 10(1), pages 1-21, February.
    22. Bessembinder, Hendrik & Kaufman, Herbert M., 1997. "A Comparison of Trade Execution Costs for NYSE and NASDAQ-Listed Stocks," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(03), pages 287-310, September.
    23. Barclay, Michael J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1993. "Stealth trading and volatility : Which trades move prices?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 281-305, December.
    24. Kryzanowski, Lawrence & Zhang, Hao, 1996. "Trading Patterns of Small and Large Traders around Stock Split Ex-dates," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 19(1), pages 75-90, Spring.
    25. Michael T. Maloney & J. Harold Mulherin, 1992. "The Effects of Splitting on the Ex: A Microstructure Reconciliation," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 21(4), Winter.
    26. Petersen, Mitchell A. & Fialkowski, David, 1994. "Posted versus effective spreads *1: Good prices or bad quotes?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 269-292, June.
    27. Lamoureux, Christopher G & Poon, Percy, 1987. " The Market Reaction to Stock Splits," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(5), pages 1347-1370, December.
    28. Desai, Anand S & Nimalendran, M & Venkataraman, S, 1998. "Changes in Trading Activity Following Stock Splits and Their Effect on Volatility and the Adverse-Information Component of the Bid-Ask Spread," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 21(2), pages 159-183, Summer.
    29. Datar, Vinay T. & Y. Naik, Narayan & Radcliffe, Robert, 1998. "Liquidity and stock returns: An alternative test," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 1(2), pages 203-219, August.
    30. Dravid, Ajay R, 1987. " A Note on the Behavior of Stock Returns around Ex-dates of Stock Distributions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(1), pages 163-168, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Arie E. Gozluklu & Pietro Perotti & Barbara Rindi & Roberta Fredella, 2013. "Removing the Trade Size Constraint? Evidence from the Italian Market Design," Working Papers 493, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uts:rpaper:62. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Duncan Ford). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/qfutsau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.