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Measuring Search Frictions Using Japanese Microdata

  • Masaru Sasaki
  • Miki Kohara
  • Tomohiro Machikita

This paper estimates matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labor market and presents determinants of search duration to explain the effect of unemployment benefits on a job seekerfs behavior. We employ administrative micro data that track the job search process of individuals who left or lost their job in August 2005 and subsequently registered at their local public employment service. Our finding is that the matching function would exhibit decreasing returns-to-scale for job seekers and vacancies, rather than constant return-to-scale. We also find that generous unemployment benefits lengthen (shorten) the duration of job search for job seekers who voluntarily (involuntarily) leave employment.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jere.12011
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Article provided by Japanese Economic Association in its journal Japanese Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 64 (2013)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 431-451

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:64:y:2013:i:4:p:431-451
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  1. Yashiv, E., 1999. "The Determinants of Equilibrium Unemployment," Papers 36-99, Tel Aviv.
  2. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, June.
  3. Masaru Sasaki, 2008. "Matching Function For The Japanese Labour Market: Random Or Stock-Flow?," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(2), pages 209-230, 04.
  4. van Ours, J.C. & Broersma, L., 1999. "Job searchers, job matches and the elasticity of matching," Other publications TiSEM c199f354-b73c-49b6-84f6-e, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  5. Coles, Melvyn G & Smith, Eric, 1994. "Cross-Section Estimation of the Matching Function: Evidence from England and Wales," CEPR Discussion Papers 966, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Gregg, Paul & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 1996. "How Effective Are State Employment Agencies? Jobcentre Use and Job Matching in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(3), pages 443-67, August.
  7. Fahr, Rene & Sunde, Uwe, 2005. "Job and vacancy competition in empirical matching functions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(6), pages 773-780, December.
  8. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal, 1998. "Job Search Methods and Outcomes," Working Papers w199808, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  9. Kano, Shigeki & Ohta, Makoto, 2005. "Estimating a matching function and regional matching efficiencies: Japanese panel data for 1973-1999," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 25-41, January.
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