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The Disincentive Effect Of Food‐For‐Work On Labour Supply And Agricultural Intensification And Diversification In Ethiopia

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  • Simon Maxwell
  • Deryke Belshaw
  • Alemayehu Lirenso

Abstract

Food‐for‐work (FFW) as a form of food aid has been criticised for its many disincentive effects. This paper investigates alleged disincentive effects of food‐for‐work (FFW) on labour supply and agricultural intensification and diversification in one district of Ethiopia, using a ranking exercise and a small survey of farmer opinion. Despite the popularity of FFW as a source of income, careful project design meant that disincentives were largely avoided. In particular, the take‐up of FFW was restricted, by a combination of self‐targeting and community based administrative rationing; and agricultural intensification and diversification were encouraged directly through extension programmes.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Maxwell & Deryke Belshaw & Alemayehu Lirenso, 1994. "The Disincentive Effect Of Food‐For‐Work On Labour Supply And Agricultural Intensification And Diversification In Ethiopia," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(3), pages 351-359, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:45:y:1994:i:3:p:351-359
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1477-9552.1994.tb00409.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fitzpatrick, Jim & Storey, Andy, 1989. "Food aid and agricultural disincentives," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 241-247, August.
    2. Maxwell, S. J. & Singer, H. W., 1979. "Food aid to developing countries: A survey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 225-246, March.
    3. Mesfin Bezuneh & Brady J. Deaton & George W. Norton, 1988. "Food Aid Impacts in Rural Kenya," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 70(1), pages 181-191.
    4. Ravallion, M., 1990. "Reaching The Poor Through Rural Public Employment; A Survey Of Theory And Evidence," World Bank - Discussion Papers 94, World Bank.
    5. Clay, Edward J., 1986. "Rural public works and food-for-work: A survey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 14(10-11), pages 1237-1252.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hoddinott, John & Margolies, Amy, 2012. "Mapping the Impacts of Food Aid: Current Knowledge and Future Directions," WIDER Working Paper Series 034, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Gebremedhin, Berhanu & Swinton, Scott M., 1999. "Reconciling Food-For-Work Objectives: Resource Conservation Vs. Food Aid Targeting In Tigray, Ethiopia," Staff Paper Series 11708, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Jayne, T. S. & Strauss, John & Yamano, Takashi & Molla, Daniel, 2001. "Giving to the Poor? Targeting of Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 887-910, May.
    4. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-34 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Echevin, Damien & Lamanna, Francesca & Oviedo, Ana-Maria, 2011. "Who Benefit from Cash and Food-for-Work Programs in Post-Earthquake Haiti?," MPRA Paper 35661, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Bezu, Sosina & Holden, Stein, 2008. "Can food-for-work encourage agricultural production?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 541-549, December.
    7. Zant, Wouter, 2012. "The economics of food aid under subsistence farming with an application to Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 124-141.
    8. Unknown, 1998. "Food Aid Targeting in Ethiopia: A Study of Household Food Insecurity and Food Aid Distributions," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54958, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Gebremedhin, Berhanu & Swinton, Scott M., 2001. "Reconciling food-for-work project feasibility with food aid targeting in Tigray, Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 85-95, February.
    10. Clay, Daniel C. & Molla, Daniel & Habtewold, Debebe, 1999. "Food aid targeting in Ethiopia: A study of who needs it and who gets it," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 391-409, August.
    11. Christopher B. Barrett & Stein T. Holden & Daniel C. Clay, 2002. "Can Food-for-Work Programmes Reduce Vulnerability?," WIDER Working Paper Series DP2002-24, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Amy Margolies & John Hoddinott, 2012. "Mapping the Impacts of Food Aid: Current Knowledge and Future Directions," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2012-034, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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