IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/etrans/v14y2006i4p611-628.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Property rights protection and access to bank loans

Author

Listed:
  • Chong-En Bai
  • Jiangyong Lu
  • Zhigang Tao

Abstract

Poor protection of private property has limited the access to bank loans by private enterprises in developing and transition economies. Under those circumstances, private entrepreneurs have resorted to various ways of enhancing the "de facto" protection of private property. Using a dataset of 3,073 private enterprises in China, this paper empirically investigates the impact of political participation and philanthropic activities - informal substitutes for the lack of formal protection of private property - on the access to bank loans. Copyright (c) 2006 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2006 The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development..

Suggested Citation

  • Chong-En Bai & Jiangyong Lu & Zhigang Tao, 2006. "Property rights protection and access to bank loans," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 14(4), pages 611-628, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:14:y:2006:i:4:p:611-628
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-0351.2006.00269.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chong-En Bai & Jiangyong Lu & Zhigang Tao, 2006. "The Multitask Theory of State Enterprise Reform: Empirical Evidence from China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 353-357, May.
    2. Beck, Thorsten & Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Laeven, Luc & Maksimovic, Vojislav, 2006. "The determinants of financing obstacles," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 932-952, October.
    3. MARA FACCIO & RONALD W. MASULIS & JOHN J. McCONNELL, 2006. "Political Connections and Corporate Bailouts," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(6), pages 2597-2635, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bai, Chong-En & Lu, Jiangyong & Tao, Zhigang, 2010. "Capital or knowhow: The role of foreign multinationals in Sino-foreign joint ventures," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 629-638, December.
    2. Cull,Robert J. & Gan,Li & Gao,Nan & Xu,L. Colin & Cull,Robert J. & Gan,Li & Gao,Nan & Xu,L. Colin, 2015. "Dual credit markets and household access to finance : evidence from a representative Chinese household survey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7454, The World Bank.
    3. Soumyajit Mazumder, 2016. "Can I stay a BIT longer? The effect of bilateral investment treaties on political survival," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 477-521, December.
    4. Avner Greif & Guido Tabellini, 2012. "The Clan and the City: Sustaining Cooperation in China and Europe," Working Papers 445, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    5. Lu, Yi & Tao, Zhigang & Wang, Yijiang, 2010. "Union effects on performance and employment relations: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 202-210, March.
    6. Du, Julan & Lu, Yi & Tao, Zhigang, 2014. "The role of the state in resolving business disputes in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 940-953.
    7. William Barnett & Mingzhi Hu & Xue Wang, 2018. "Does the Utilization of Information Communication Technology Promote Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Rural China," WORKING PAPERS SERIES IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS 201802, University of Kansas, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2018.
    8. Zhang, Min & Liu, Yaosong & Xie, Lu & Ye, Tingting, 2017. "Does the cutoff of “red capital” raise a red flag? Political connections and stock price crash risk," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 89-109.
    9. Wendy Dobson & Anil K. Kashyap, 2006. "The Contradiction in China's Gradualist Banking Reforms," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 37(2), pages 103-162.
    10. repec:pal:jintbs:v:48:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1057_s41267-016-0050-z is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Daniel Berkowitz, 2016. "Recasting the Iron Rice Bowl: The Reform of China's State Owned Enterprises," Working Paper 5858, Department of Economics, University of Pittsburgh.
    12. Chen, Donghua & Jiang, Dequan & Yu, Xin, 2015. "Corporate philanthropy and bank loans in China," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 35(PA), pages 402-424.
    13. Du, Julan & Lu, Yi & Tao, Zhigang, 2009. "China as a regulatory state," BOFIT Discussion Papers 17/2009, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    14. Ding, Mingfa, 2014. "Political Connections and Stock Liquidity: Political Network, Hierarchy and Intervention," Knut Wicksell Working Paper Series 2014/7, Lund University, Knut Wicksell Centre for Financial Studies.
    15. Dang, Tri Vi & He, Qing, 2016. "Bureaucrats as successor CEOs," BOFIT Discussion Papers 13/2016, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    16. Qian, Xianhang & Zhang, Guangli & Liu, Haiming, 2015. "Officials on boards and the prudential behavior of banks: Evidence from China's city commercial banks," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 84-96.
    17. Long, Cheryl & Yang, Jin, 2016. "What explains Chinese private entrepreneurs' charitable behaviors?—A story of dynamic reciprocal relationship between firms and the government," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 1-16.
    18. Du, Julan & Lu, Yi & Tao, Zhigang, 2015. "Government expropriation and Chinese-style firm diversification," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 155-169.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:14:y:2006:i:4:p:611-628. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ebrdduk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.