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Wage differentials and state‐private sector employment choice in Yugoslavia

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  • Michael M. Lokshin
  • Branko Jovanovic

Abstract

In this study we use the newly available Yugoslavian Labor Force Survey data to investigate wage differentials and employment decisions in the state and private sectors in Yugoslavia. For the analysis we use three empirical models that rely on different statistical assumptions. We extend the standard switching regression model to allow non‐normality in the joint distribution of the error terms. After correcting for the sector selection bias and controlling for workers’ characteristics we find a private sector wage advantage. The wage premium is largest for workers with low education levels and declining for workers with higher educational levels. Given the regulatory and tax policies that pushed the private sector into the informal sphere of the economy during the period covered by our data, we argue that the state/private wage gap is likely to grow in the future. This will make it increasingly difficult for the state sector to attract and retain highly skilled employees.

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  • Michael M. Lokshin & Branko Jovanovic, 2003. "Wage differentials and state‐private sector employment choice in Yugoslavia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 11(3), pages 463-491, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:11:y:2003:i:3:p:463-491
    DOI: 10.1111/1468-0351.00153
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Yang & Sylvie Demurger & Shi Li, 2011. "Do Employees in the Public Sector Still Enjoy Earnings Advantages?," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 201118, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
    2. Nguyen Danh, Hoang Long, 2002. "public-private sector wage differentials for males and females in vietnam," MPRA Paper 6583, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Saha, Sarani & Roy, Poulomi & Kar, Saibal, 2014. "Public and private sector jobs, unreported income and consumption gap in India: Evidence from micro-data," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 285-300.
    4. Gimpelson, Vladimir & Lukiyanova, Anna & Sharunina, Anna, 2019. "Economics and Politics of the Public-Private Wage Gap (The Case of Russia)," IZA Discussion Papers 12247, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Sylvie Dmurger & Martin Fournier & Li Shi & Wei Zhong, 2006. "Economic Liberalization with Rising Segmentation in China's Urban Labor Market," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 5(3), pages 58-101, Fall.
    6. Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Sabirianova Peter, Klara, 2007. "Public sector pay and corruption: Measuring bribery from micro data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(5-6), pages 963-991, June.
    7. Vladisavljević, Marko & Narazani, Edlira & Golubović, Vojin, 2017. "Public-private wage differences in the Western Balkan countries," MPRA Paper 80739, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Gabriela Grotkowska & Leszek Wincenciak & Tomasz Gajderowicz, 2017. "Evolution of the Public-Sector Wage Premium in Poland," Gospodarka Narodowa. The Polish Journal of Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 1, pages 5-31.
    9. Vladimir Gimpelson & Anna Lukiyanova & Anna Sharunina, 2015. "Estimating the Public-Private Wage Gap in Russia: What Does Quantile Regression Tell Us?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 104/EC/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    10. Jelena Laušev, 2012. "Public Sector Pay Gap In Serbia During Large-Scale Privatisation,By Educational Qualification," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 57(192), pages 7-24, January –.
    11. Jelena Nikolic & Ivica Rubil & Iva Tomic, 2014. "Changes in Public and Private Sector Pay Structures in Two Emerging Market Economies during the Crisis," Working Papers 1403, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb.
    12. Chatterji, Monojit & Maczulskij, Terhi & Pehkonen, Jaakko, 2008. "Public Sector Pay in Finland," SIRE Discussion Papers 2008-31, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    13. Tansel, Aysit & Keskin, Halil Ibrahim & Ozdemir, Zeynel Abidin, 2020. "Public-private sector wage gap by gender in Egypt: Evidence from quantile regression on panel data, 1998–2018," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 135(C).
    14. Ebo Botchway & Kofi Fred Asiedu, 2020. "Ownership type and earnings gap decomposition: Evidence from the Ghanaian labor market," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 32(4), pages 619-631, December.
    15. Jelena Lausev, 2014. "WHAT HAS 20 YEARS OF PUBLIC–PRIVATE PAY GAP LITERATURE TOLD US? EASTERN EUROPEAN TRANSITIONING vs. DEVELOPED ECONOMIES," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 516-550, July.
    16. World Bank, 2008. "Kosovo - Youth in Jeopardy : Being Young, Unemployed, and Poor in Kosovo," World Bank Publications - Reports 7895, The World Bank Group.
    17. Alejandra Mizala & Pilar Romaguera & Sebastian Gallegos, 2010. "Public-Private Wage Gap In Latin America (1999-2007): A Matching Approach," Documentos de Trabajo 268, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    18. Démurger, Sylvie & Li, Shi & Yang, Juan, 2012. "Earnings differentials between the public and private sectors in China: Exploring changes for urban local residents in the 2000s," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 138-153.
    19. Nikolic, Jelena & Rubil, Ivica & Tomić, Iva, 2017. "Pre-crisis reforms, austerity measures and the public-private wage gap in two emerging economies," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 248-265.
    20. Linz, Susan J. & Semykina, Anastasia, 2009. "Personality traits as performance enhancers? A comparative analysis of workers in Russia, Armenia and Kazakhstan," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 71-91, February.
    21. Marko Vladisavljević, 2017. "The Public Sector Wage Premium And Fiscal Consolidation In Serbia," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 62(215), pages 111-134, October –.
    22. Costas Christou, 2013. "The dynamics of wage determination in Romania," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 21(4), pages 713-729, October.
    23. Kosovka Ognjenović, 2011. "Wage Differences between the Private and the Public Sector in Serbia: Some Evidence from Survey Data," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 91, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    24. Zhuravleva, T.L. (Журавлева, Т.), 2016. "Social Benefits, Job Security and Corruption: What 'Fine' State Employees [Социальные Льготы, Гарантии Занятости И Коррупция: Что «Штрафует» Бюджетников]," Working Papers 3051, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.

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