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Women and Retirement Incomes in Australia: A Review

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  • THERESE JEFFERSON

Abstract

More than 60 per cent of age pensioners in Australia are women. Although public policy encourages private saving for retirement through compulsory superannuation, projections of women's superannuation accumulations predict that women will continue to rely heavily on government and private transfers in retirement. This review synthesises the outcomes from existing research to show that expectations about the level and source of women's retirement incomes are clearly linked with low earnings. This occurs in combination with both attitudinal and institutional barriers to active retirement planning. Copyright 2005 The Economic Society Of Australia.

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  • Therese Jefferson, 2005. "Women and Retirement Incomes in Australia: A Review," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 81(254), pages 273-291, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:81:y:2005:i:254:p:273-291
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    Cited by:

    1. Anup K. Basu & Michael E. Drew, 2009. "The Case for Gender-Sensitive Superannuation Plan Design," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(2), pages 177-189.
    2. David Laibson, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-478.
    3. repec:eee:joecag:v:6:y:2015:i:c:p:149-162 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Andrew Worthington, 2008. "Knowledge and Perceptions of Superannuation in Australia," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 349-368, September.
    5. Siobhan Austen & Rachel Ong & Sherry Bawa & Therese Jefferson, 2013. "Trends in the Gender Wealth Gap Among Single Households in Australia, 2002-2010," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1308, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

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