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Labour Market Institutions and Technological Employment




Our paper seeks to gain insights into the effect of labour market institutions on the dynamics of the labour market during the diffusion process of new technologies. We develop an endogenous job destruction matching framework, with heterogeneous workers, where the segmentation of the labour market between workers having the required ability to do a technological job and the rest of the workers is endogenous. The dynamics of this segmentation may follow a monotonous decreasing path or a non-monotonous U‐shaped path depending on the unemployment benefit system. If benefits are generous, we are in the U‐shaped case.

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  • Arnaud Chéron & Francois Langot & Eva Moreno‐Galbis, 2011. "Labour Market Institutions and Technological Employment," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 78(309), pages 159-186, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:78:y:2011:i:309:p:159-186

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. L. Rachel Ngai & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2007. "Structural Change in a Multisector Model of Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 429-443, March.
    2. Mortensen, Dale T & Pissarides, Christopher A, 1999. "Unemployment Responses to 'Skill-Biased' Technology Shocks: The Role of Labour Market Policy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(455), pages 242-265, April.
    3. Mortensen, Dale & Pissarides, Christopher, 2011. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 1-19.
    4. Alexandra Spitz-Oener, 2006. "Technical Change, Job Tasks, and Rising Educational Demands: Looking outside the Wage Structure," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(2), pages 235-270, April.
    5. James Albrecht & Susan Vroman, 2002. "A Matching Model with Endogenous Skill Requirements," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 283-305, February.
    6. Aguirregabiria, Victor & Alonso-Borrego, Cesar, 2001. "Occupational structure, technological innovation, and reorganization of production," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 43-73, January.
    7. Stephen Machin & John Van Reenen, 1998. "Technology and Changes in Skill Structure: Evidence from Seven OECD Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1215-1244.
    8. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    9. E. Moreno-Galbis & Henri Sneessens, 2007. "Low-skilled unemployment, capital-skill complementarity and embodied technical progress," Recherches économiques de Louvain, De Boeck Université, vol. 73(3), pages 241-272.
    10. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2007. "Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(1), pages 118-133, February.
    11. Gautier, Pieter A, 2002. "Unemployment and Search Externalities in a Model with Heterogeneous Jobs and Workers," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(273), pages 21-40, February.
    12. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Melissa S. Kearney, 2006. "The Polarization of the U.S. Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 189-194, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Moreno-Galbis, Eva & Sopraseuth, Thepthida, 2014. "Job polarization in aging economies," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 44-55.
    2. Stéphane Adjemian & François Langot & Coralia Quintero-Rojas, 2010. "How do Labor Market Institutions affect the Link between Growth and Unemployment: the case of the European countries," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 7(2), pages 347-371, December.
    3. Pierre-Jean Messe & Eva Moreno-Galbis & François-Charles Wolf, 2014. "Retirement intentions in the presence of technological change: Theory and evidence from France," TEPP Working Paper 2014-04, TEPP.

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