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Is There Job Polarization at the Firm Level?

Author

Listed:
  • Petri Böckerman

    (Labour Institute for Economic Research)

  • Seppo Laaksonen

    (University of Helsinki)

  • Jari Vainiomäki

    (School of Management, University of Tampere)

Abstract

We perform decompositions and regression analyses that test for the routinization hypothesis and job polarization at the firm level, instead of the aggregate or industry level as in previous studies. Furthermore, we examine the technology-based explanations for routinization and job polarization at the firm level using firm-level R&D as an explanatory variable in the regressions. Our results for the intermediate education group and the routine occupation group are consistent with polarization at the firm level, i.e. disappearing middle due to technological change. These results are robust for accounting for dynamic selection effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Petri Böckerman & Seppo Laaksonen & Jari Vainiomäki, 2013. "Is There Job Polarization at the Firm Level?," Working Papers 1391, Tampere University, School of Management and Business, Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tam:wpaper:1391
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    File URL: http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-951-44-9247-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Firms polarize, too
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-12-04 21:49:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Terhi Maczulskij, 2019. "Occupational Mobility of Routine Workers," Working Papers 327, Palkansaajien tutkimuslaitos, Labour Institute for Economic Research.
    2. James Harrigan & Ariell Reshef & Farid Toubal, 2016. "The March of the Techies: Technology, Trade, and Job Polarization in France, 1994-2007," Working Papers 2016-15, CEPII research center.
    3. Terhi Maczulskij & Mika Maliranta & Sari Pekkala Kerr, 2016. "Within and Between Firm Trends in Job Polarization: Role of Globalization and Technology," Working Papers 308, Palkansaajien tutkimuslaitos, Labour Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Merja Kauhanen & Terhi Maczulskij, 2017. "Where do workers from declining routine jobs go and does migration matter?," Working Papers 314, Palkansaajien tutkimuslaitos, Labour Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Petri Böckerman & Seppo Laaksonen & Jari Vainiomäki, 2016. "Are jobs more polarized in ICT firms?," Working Papers 303, Palkansaajien tutkimuslaitos, Labour Institute for Economic Research.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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