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The Growth of Gambling and Prediction Markets: Economic and Financial Implications




In recent years, there has been a substantial global increase in gambling and prediction markets, including casinos, sports betting, lotteries, elections and wagering on financial instruments. This trend has heightened interest in numerous economic and financial issues related to this sector. These include questions relating to the efficiency of these markets, heterogeneity in risk attitudes among economic agents, and the use of prediction markets in policy analysis. The papers in this special issue provide a mix of theoretical and empirical evidence on these issues. Copyright (c) The London School of Economics and Political Science 2008.

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  • David Paton & Donald S. Siegel & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2009. "The Growth of Gambling and Prediction Markets: Economic and Financial Implications," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 76(302), pages 219-224, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:76:y:2009:i:302:p:219-224

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jacob K. Goeree & Charles A. Holt, 2001. "Ten Little Treasures of Game Theory and Ten Intuitive Contradictions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1402-1422, December.
    2. Richard Borghesi, 2007. "Price Biases in a Prediction Market: NFL Contracts on Tradesports," Journal of Prediction Markets, University of Buckingham Press, vol. 1(3), pages 233-253, December.
    3. Michael A. Smith & David Paton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2006. "Market Efficiency in Person-to-Person Betting," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(292), pages 673-689, November.
    4. Paton, David & Siegel, Donald S. & Williams, Leighton Vaughan, 2004. "Taxation and the Demand for Gambling: New Evidence From the United Kingdom," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 57(4), pages 847-861, December.
    5. Justin Wolfers & Eric Zitzewitz, 2004. "Prediction Markets," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(2), pages 107-126, Spring.
    6. Vaughan Williams, Leighton, 1999. "Information Efficiency in Betting Markets: A Survey," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 1-30, January.
    7. Williams, Leighton Vaughan & Paton, David, 1997. "Why Is There a Favourite-Longshot Bias in British Racetrack Betting Markets?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 150-158, January.
    8. Vaughan Williams,Leighton (ed.), 2005. "Information Efficiency in Financial and Betting Markets," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521816038, March.
    9. Paul W. Rhode & Koleman S. Strumpf, 2004. "Historical Presidential Betting Markets," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(2), pages 127-141, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Smith, Michael A. & Paton, David & Williams, Leighton Vaughan, 2009. "Do bookmakers possess superior skills to bettors in predicting outcomes?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 539-549, August.

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