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Market Efficiency in Person-to-Person Betting

Author

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  • MICHAEL A. SMITH
  • DAVID PATON
  • LEIGHTON VAUGHAN WILLIAMS

Abstract

Bookmakers have argued that person-to-person internet 'betting exchanges' represent unfair competition. In this paper we suggest that, in fact, betting exchanges have brought about significant efficiency gains by lowering transaction costs for consumers. We test this hypothesis using matched data on UK horse racing from betting exchanges and from traditional betting media. In comparison with traditional betting media, we find that betting exchanges exhibit evidence of significantly lower market biases. We also find that an information-based model explains the well documented favourite-longshot bias more convincingly than traditional explanations based on risk preferences. Copyright (c) The London School of Economics and Political Science 2006.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael A. Smith & David Paton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2006. "Market Efficiency in Person-to-Person Betting," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(292), pages 673-689, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:73:y:2006:i:292:p:673-689
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karen Croxson & J. James Reade, 2011. "Exchange vs Dealers: A High-Frequency Analysis of In-Play Betting Prices," Discussion Papers 11-19, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    2. Brown, Alasdair & Yang, Fuyu, 2015. "Does society underestimate women? Evidence from the performance of female jockeys in horse racing," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 106-118.
    3. repec:eee:quaeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:306-317 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Egon Franck & Erwin Verbeek & Stephan Nüesch, 2013. "Inter-market Arbitrage in Betting," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 80(318), pages 300-325, April.
    5. repec:kap:expeco:v:20:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10683-016-9486-z is not listed on IDEAS
    6. David Paton & Donald S. Siegel & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2009. "The Growth of Gambling and Prediction Markets: Economic and Financial Implications," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 76(302), pages 219-224, April.
    7. Flepp, Raphael & Nüesch, Stephan & Franck, Egon, 2017. "The liquidity advantage of the quote-driven market: Evidence from the betting industry," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 306-317.
    8. Smith, Michael A. & Paton, David & Williams, Leighton Vaughan, 2009. "Do bookmakers possess superior skills to bettors in predicting outcomes?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 539-549, August.
    9. Dominic Cortis & Steve Hales & Frank Bezzina, 2013. "Profiting On Inefficiencies In Betting Derivative Markets: The Case Of Uefa Euro 2012," Journal of Gambling Business and Economics, University of Buckingham Press, vol. 7(1), pages 39-51.
    10. Franck, Egon & Verbeek, Erwin & Nüesch, Stephan, 2010. "Prediction accuracy of different market structures -- bookmakers versus a betting exchange," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 448-459, July.
    11. Sung, Ming-Chien & Johnson, Johnnie E.V. & McDonald, David C.J., 2016. "Informed trading, market efficiency and volatility," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 56-59.
    12. John Peirson, 2008. "Expert Analysis and Insider Information in Horse Race Betting: Regulating Informed Market Behaviour," Studies in Economics 0819, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    13. Marshall, Ben R., 2009. "How quickly is temporary market inefficiency removed?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 917-930, August.
    14. Martin Kukuk & Stefan Winter, 2008. "An Alternative Explanation of the Favorite-Longshot Bias," Journal of Gambling Business and Economics, University of Buckingham Press, vol. 2(2), pages 79-96, September.
    15. repec:eee:finlet:v:23:y:2017:i:c:p:174-178 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Smith, Michael A. & Vaughan Williams, Leighton, 2010. "Forecasting horse race outcomes: New evidence on odds bias in UK betting markets," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 543-550, July.
    17. Martin Spann & Bernd Skiera, 2009. "Sports forecasting: a comparison of the forecast accuracy of prediction markets, betting odds and tipsters," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 55-72.
    18. Loreto Llorente, 2006. "A Profitable Strategy in the Pelota Betting Market," Documentos de Trabajo - Lan Gaiak Departamento de Economía - Universidad Pública de Navarra 0606, Departamento de Economía - Universidad Pública de Navarra.
    19. Nikolaos Vlastakis & George Dotsis & Raphael N. Markellos, 2009. "How efficient is the European football betting market? Evidence from arbitrage and trading strategies," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(5), pages 426-444.
    20. Page, Lionel, 2009. "Is there an optimistic bias on betting markets?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 70-72, February.
    21. Stefan Winter & Martin Kukuk, 2008. "Do horses like vodka and sponging? - On market manipulation and the favourite-longshot bias," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 75-87.

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