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The Effect Of Housing Wealth Losses On Spending In The Great Recession

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  • Marco Angrisani
  • Michael Hurd
  • Susann Rohwedder

Abstract

We use panel data on a complete inventory of household spending and assets to estimate the spending response to the sharp and largely unexpected declines in house values that occurred in the Great Recession. Our study complements the existing literature on this topic by relying exclusively on longitudinal micro data on both household wealth and expenditure. Our data span the period 2002–2012, allowing us to separate trends in spending from innovations in response to unexpected wealth changes. We find the marginal propensity to consume out of an unexpected housing wealth change to be 6 cents per dollar among older American households. (JEL D12, D14, E21)

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Angrisani & Michael Hurd & Susann Rohwedder, 2019. "The Effect Of Housing Wealth Losses On Spending In The Great Recession," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 57(2), pages 972-996, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:57:y:2019:i:2:p:972-996
    DOI: 10.1111/ecin.12753
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Renata Bottazzi & Serena Trucchi & Matthew Wakefield, 2013. "Wealth effects and the consumption of Italian households in the Great Recession," IFS Working Papers W13/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    2. Richard Disney & John Gathergood & Andrew Henley, 2010. "House Price Shocks, Negative Equity, and Household Consumption in the United Kingdom," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(6), pages 1179-1207, December.
    3. Kaplan, Greg & Mitman, Kurt & Violante, Giovanni L., 2020. "Non-durable consumption and housing net worth in the Great Recession: Evidence from easily accessible data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 189(C).
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    Cited by:

    1. Chanda, Areendam & Cook, Justin, 2019. "Who Gained from India’s Demonetization? Insights from Satellites and Surveys," MPRA Paper 95762, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Mairead Roiste & Apostolos Fasianos & Robert Kirkby & Fang Yao, 2021. "Are Housing Wealth Effects Asymmetric in Booms and Busts?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 62(4), pages 578-628, May.
    3. Carlos Madeira, 2020. "The potential impact of financial portability measures on mortgage refinancing: Evidence from Chile," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 894, Central Bank of Chile.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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