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Do They Work? Assessing the Impact of Transparency and Accountability Initiatives in Service Delivery

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  • Anuradha Joshi

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  • Anuradha Joshi, 2013. "Do They Work? Assessing the Impact of Transparency and Accountability Initiatives in Service Delivery," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 31, pages 29-48, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:31:y:2013:i::p:s29-s48
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/dpr.12018
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    1. Gérard Lassibille & Jee-Peng Tan & Cornelia Jesse & Trang Van Nguyen, 2010. "Managing for Results in Primary Education in Madagascar: Evaluating the Impact of Selected Workflow Interventions," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 24(2), pages 303-329, August.
    2. Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & Michael Kremer, 2011. "Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1739-1774, August.
    3. Richard Batley, 1999. "The new public management in developing countries: implications for policy and organizational reform," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(5), pages 761-765.
    4. Deichmann, Uwe & Lall, Somik V., 2007. "Citizen Feedback and Delivery of Urban Services," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 649-662, April.
    5. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Rukmini Banerji & Esther Duflo & Rachel Glennerster & Stuti Khemani, 2010. "Pitfalls of Participatory Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Education in India," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 1-30, February.
    6. Priyanka Pandey & Sangeeta Goyal & Venkatesh Sundararaman, 2009. "Community participation in public schools: impact of information campaigns in three Indian states," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 355-375.
    7. Benjamin A. Olken, 2007. "Monitoring Corruption: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 200-249.
    8. Paul Hubbard, 2007. "Putting the Power of Transparency in Context: Information’s Role in Reducing Corruption in Uganda’s Education Sector," Working Papers 136, Center for Global Development.
    9. Anuradha Joshi & Peter P. Houtzager, 2012. "Widgets or Watchdogs?," Public Management Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 145-162, February.
    10. Ritva Reinikka & Jakob Svensson, 2005. "Fighting Corruption to Improve Schooling: Evidence from a Newspaper Campaign in Uganda," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 259-267, 04/05.
    11. Dena Ringold & Alaka Holla & Margaret Koziol & Santhosh Srinivasan, 2012. "Citizens and Service Delivery : Assessing the Use of Social Accountability Approaches in the Human Development Sectors," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2377, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joanna Buckley & Neil McCulloch & Nick Travis, 2017. "Donor-supported approaches to improving extractives governance: Lessons from Nigeria and Ghana," WIDER Working Paper Series 033, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:160-172 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i:2:p:289-311 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Nisbett, Nicholas & Gillespie, Stuart & Haddad, Lawrence & Harris, Jody, 2014. "Why Worry About the Politics of Childhood Undernutrition?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 420-433.
    5. Fox, Jonathan A., 2015. "Social Accountability: What Does the Evidence Really Say?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 346-361.
    6. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i::p:o178-o195 is not listed on IDEAS

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