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Putting the Power of Transparency in Context: Information’s Role in Reducing Corruption in Uganda’s Education Sector

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  • Paul Hubbard

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Abstract

One of the popular stories told (and taught) in development circles is how corruption was slashed in Uganda simply by publishing the amount of monthly grants to schools. This paper takes a deeper look at the facts behind the Uganda story and finds that while information did indeed play a critical role, the story is much more complicated than we have been led to believe. A dramatic drop did occur in the percentage of funds being diverted from Uganda’s capitation grant. But to attribute this leakage solely to the monthly release of grant data by the government risks ignoring the major funding in which this transparency campaign was imbedded.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Hubbard, 2007. "Putting the Power of Transparency in Context: Information’s Role in Reducing Corruption in Uganda’s Education Sector," Working Papers 136, Center for Global Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:136
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    File URL: http://www.cgdev.org/content/publications/detail/15050
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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank Group, 2014. "Strategic Framework for Mainstreaming Citizen Engagement in World Bank Group Operations," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21113, October.
    2. Matthew Lockwood, 2013. "What Can Climate-Adaptation Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa Learn from Research on Governance and Politics?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 31(6), pages 647-676, November.
    3. Fox, Jonathan A., 2015. "Social Accountability: What Does the Evidence Really Say?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 346-361.
    4. David Booth, 2012. "Working with the Grain and Swimming against the Tide," Public Management Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 163-180, February.
    5. repec:taf:jdevst:v:52:y:2016:i:8:p:1225-1240 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Helene Grandvoinnet & Ghazia Aslam & Shomikho Raha, 2015. "Opening the Black Box," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21686, October.
    7. Anuradha Joshi, 2013. "Do They Work? Assessing the Impact of Transparency and Accountability Initiatives in Service Delivery," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 31, pages 29-48, July.
    8. Ruth Carlitz, 2013. "Improving Transparency and Accountability in the Budget Process: An Assessment of Recent Initiatives," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 31, pages 49-67, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; Uganda; corruption; transparency;

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