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Determinants And Dynamics Of Schooling And Child Labour In Bolivia

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  • Francesco Grigoli
  • Giacomo Sbrana

Abstract

This paper investigates the determinants of primary school enrollment, attendance and child labor in Bolivia from 1999 to 2007. The analysis also aims at identifying the substitution and complementary relationships between schooling and working. Although enrollment rates show a significant improvement, lack of attendance remains an issue. The empirical results reveal that the increase in enrollment is led by indigenous children and those living in urban areas. Moreover, contrary to common belief, being extremely poor and indigenous are the main determinants of school attendance. Although extremely poor children increased their school attendance, they were not able to reduce child labor. However, for indigenous children school attendance and child labor were substitutes, increasing schooling and reducing child labor.
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  • Francesco Grigoli & Giacomo Sbrana, 2013. "Determinants And Dynamics Of Schooling And Child Labour In Bolivia," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65, pages 17-37, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:65:y:2013:i::p:s17-s37
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8586.2012.00462.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ghulam Abid & Binish Khan & Zeeshan Rafiq & Alia Ahmed, 2015. "Child Trade-Off Theory: A Theoretical Discussion on the Structure, Causes, Consequences and Eradication of Child Labor," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 4(1), pages 24-34, March.
    2. Bredl, Sebastian, 2012. "Child Quality and Child Quantity: Evidence from Bolivian Household Surveys," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62065, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Carla Canelas & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2018. "Schooling and labour market impacts of Bolivia’s Bono Juancito Pinto," WIDER Working Paper Series 036, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Diego A. Vera Cossio, 2011. "Enrollment and child labor in Bolivia," Development Research Working Paper Series 11/2011, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.

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