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Do Different Work Characteristics Have Different Distributional Impacts on Job Satisfaction? A Study of Slope Heterogeneity in Workers’ Well-Being


  • Aekapol Chongvilaivan
  • Nattavudh Powdthavee


This article is an empirical study of slope heterogeneity in job satisfaction. It provides evidence from the generalized ordered probit models that different job characteristics tend to have different distributional impacts on the overall job satisfaction. For instance, standard models tend to significantly underestimate the effects of monthly salary and hours worked at generating the ‘highly’ satisfied workers, while lowering the incidence of the ‘very dissatisfied’ workers. Although our results should be viewed as illustrative, we provide discussions of their potential implications for employers and on how they could help with the design of employment contracts.

Suggested Citation

  • Aekapol Chongvilaivan & Nattavudh Powdthavee, 2014. "Do Different Work Characteristics Have Different Distributional Impacts on Job Satisfaction? A Study of Slope Heterogeneity in Workers’ Well-Being," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 52(3), pages 426-444, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:52:y:2014:i:3:p:426-444

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Andrew Clark & Fabrice Etilé & Fabien Postel-Vinay & Claudia Senik & Karine Van der Straeten, 2005. "Heterogeneity in Reported Well-Being: Evidence from Twelve European Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(502), pages 118-132, March.
    2. Gabriella Conti & Stephen Pudney, 2011. "Survey Design and the Analysis of Satisfaction," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 1087-1093, August.
    3. Stefan Boes & Rainer Winkelmann, 2006. "Ordered response models," AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis, Springer;German Statistical Society, vol. 90(1), pages 167-181, March.
    4. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
    5. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    6. Stefan Boes & Rainer Winkelmann, 2004. "Income and Happiness: New Results from Generalized Threshold and Sequential Models," SOI - Working Papers 0407, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich.
    7. Powdthavee, Nattavudh & van den Berg, Bernard, 2011. "Putting different price tags on the same health condition: Re-evaluating the well-being valuation approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1032-1043.
    8. Emmanouil Mentzakis, 2011. "Allowing for heterogeneity in monetary subjective well‐being valuations," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 331-347, March.
    9. Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2011. "Life Satisfaction and Grandparenthood: Evidence from a Nationwide Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 5869, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada, 2005. "Income and well-being: an empirical analysis of the comparison income effect," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 997-1019, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aekapol Chongvilaivan & Kiyoshi Taniguchi & Rommel Rabanal, 2016. "Impacts of Road Access on Subjective Well-being in Timor-Leste," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 91-114, March.
    2. Becchetti, Leonardo & Castriota, Stefano & Corrado, Luisa & Ricca, Elena Giachin, 2013. "Beyond the Joneses: Inter-country income comparisons and happiness," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 187-195.
    3. Chaudhuri, Kausik & Reilly, Kevin T. & Spencer, David A., 2015. "Job satisfaction, age and tenure: A generalized dynamic random effects model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 13-16.
    4. Bryan, Mark L. & Nandi, Alita, 2015. "Working hours, work identity and subjective wellbeing," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-21, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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