IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/brjirl/v43y2005i2p273-295.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Work-Life Balance and the Demand for Reduction in Working Hours: Evidence from the British Social Attitudes Survey 2002

Author

Listed:
  • John MacInnes

Abstract

Work-life balance policies aimed at reducing working hours are often assumed to be of particular interest to workers with family responsibilities such as young children. Although workers in Britain report the kind of time-stress envisaged by the debate over a 'long-hours culture', there is little relationship between workers' family situation and preferences for working fewer hours. Women workers' hours already reflect family commitments to some extent, while families with young children may need the income levels that only substantial working hours bring. Conversely workers without family commitments may have more capacity to swap income or career progression for increased leisure time. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2005.

Suggested Citation

  • John MacInnes, 2005. "Work-Life Balance and the Demand for Reduction in Working Hours: Evidence from the British Social Attitudes Survey 2002," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(2), pages 273-295, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:43:y:2005:i:2:p:273-295
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2005.00355.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gerhard BOSCH, 1999. "Working time: Tendencies and emerging issues," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 138(2), pages 131-149, June.
    2. Francis Green, 2001. "It's Been A Hard Day's Night: The Concentration and Intensification of Work in Late Twentieth-Century Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 39(1), pages 53-80, March.
    3. Joƫlle Sleebos, 2003. "Low Fertility Rates in OECD Countries: Facts and Policy Responses," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 15, OECD Publishing.
    4. Paul Demeny, 2003. "Population Policy Dilemmas in Europe at the Dawn of the Twenty-First Century," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 29(1), pages 1-28.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:blg:journl:v:12:y:2017:i:2:p:155-175 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Surhan Cam, 2014. "The Underemployed: Evidence From the UK Labour Force Survey for a Conditionally Gendered Top-down Model," Journal of Social Science Studies, Macrothink Institute, vol. 1(2), pages 47-65, July.
    3. Frances McGinnity & Emma Calvert, 2008. "Yuppie Kvetch? Work-life Conflict and Social Class in Western Europe," Papers WP239, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    4. Heywood, John S. & Siebert, W. Stanley & Wei, Xiangdong, 2005. "High Performance Workplaces and Family Friendly Practices: Promises Made and Promises Kept," IZA Discussion Papers 1812, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Dan Wheatley & Irene Hardill & Bruce Philp, 2008. "Managing reductions in working hours: a study of work-time and leisure preferences in UK industry," Working Papers 2008/5, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.
    6. Zubovic, Jovan, 2010. "Razvoj privrede zasnovan na ulaganjima u ljudske resurse i stranim investicijama
      [Economic Growth Based on Investments in Human Resources and Foreign Investments]
      ," MPRA Paper 64092, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:43:y:2005:i:2:p:273-295. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/lsepsuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.