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Cryptocurrencies and Digital Fiat Currencies

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  • Robert Kirkby

Abstract

Current generations of cryptocurrencies are not money, but future ones may be. While Bitcoin performs poorly as a store of value, it is actually on par with the Venezuelan bolívar over the last decade, and the Argentinian peso over the decade from 1986. I evaluate arguments in favour of central banks issuing digital fiat currency—intended to replace cash—and digital fiat money—intended to replace money more broadly. Digital fiat currency appears a natural step forward, but digital fiat money would be a bad idea as it makes the central bank responsible for the entire money supply.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Kirkby, 2018. "Cryptocurrencies and Digital Fiat Currencies," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 51(4), pages 527-539, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:51:y:2018:i:4:p:527-539
    DOI: 10.1111/1467-8462.12307
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8462.12307
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lagos, Ricardo & Wright, Randall, 2003. "Dynamics, cycles, and sunspot equilibria in 'genuinely dynamic, fundamentally disaggregative' models of money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 109(2), pages 156-171, April.
    2. Martin, Antoine & Schreft, Stacey L., 2006. "Currency competition: A partial vindication of Hayek," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(8), pages 2085-2111, November.
    3. Cyril Monnet & Daniel R. Sanches, 2015. "Private Money and Banking Regulation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(6), pages 1031-1062, September.
    4. Gandal, Neil & Hamrick, JT & Moore, Tyler & Oberman, Tali, 2018. "Price manipulation in the Bitcoin ecosystem," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 86-96.
    5. Richard Schmalensee & Robert N Stavins, 2017. "The design of environmental markets: What have we learned from experience with cap and trade?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(4), pages 572-588.
    6. Christie Smith & Aaron Kumar, 2018. "Crypto‐Currencies – An Introduction To Not‐So‐Funny Moneys," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(5), pages 1531-1559, December.
    7. Adrian (Wai-Kong) Cheung & Eduardo Roca & Jen-Je Su, 2015. "Crypto-currency bubbles: an application of the Phillips-Shi-Yu (2013) methodology on Mt. Gox bitcoin prices," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(23), pages 2348-2358, May.
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