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Effects of Knowledge Spillovers on Knowledge Production and Productivity Growth in Korean Manufacturing Firms

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  • Taegi Kim
  • Keith Maskus
  • Keun-Yeob Oh

Abstract

type="main"> Using Korean firm-level data, this paper studies the effects of knowledge spillovers on knowledge production and productivity growth. Data from 213 Korean firms for the years 1985 to 2007 are used, and the number of patent applications is used as a proxy variable for knowledge. The results show that all the growth rates of output, patents, and productivity are higher in high-technology firms. Regression results show that the spillover effect on knowledge production and productivity growth is very significant, and that the spillover effect is larger in small firms than in large firms. Moreover, spillover effects on productivity growth are larger after 1995, when Korean intellectual property rights were strengthened. Our findings suggest that the effects of knowledge spillover on productivity are positively correlated with strong intellectual property rights.

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  • Taegi Kim & Keith Maskus & Keun-Yeob Oh, 2014. "Effects of Knowledge Spillovers on Knowledge Production and Productivity Growth in Korean Manufacturing Firms," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 28(1), pages 63-79, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiaec:v:28:y:2014:i:1:p:63-79
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/asej.12025
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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Keller, Wolfgang, 2002. "Trade and the Transmission of Technology," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 5-24, March.
    3. Yasser Abdih & Frederick Joutz, 2006. "Relating the Knowledge Production Function to Total Factor Productivity: An Endogenous Growth Puzzle," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 53(2), pages 1-3.
    4. Sakakibara, Mariko & Branstetter, Lee, 2001. "Do Stronger Patents Induce More Innovation? Evidence from the 1988 Japanese Patent Law Reforms," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 32(1), pages 77-100, Spring.
    5. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 71-102, October.
    6. Coe, David T. & Helpman, Elhanan, 1995. "International R&D spillovers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 859-887, May.
    7. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1962. "The Economic Implications of Learning by Doing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(3), pages 155-173.
    8. Taegi Kim & Keith E. Maskus & Keun-Yeob Oh, 2009. "Effects Of Patents On Productivity Growth In Korean Manufacturing: A Panel Data Analysis," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(2), pages 137-154, May.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Deming Zeng & Luyun Xu & Xia-an Bi, 2017. "Effects of asymmetric knowledge spillovers on the stability of horizontal and vertical R&D cooperation," Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 32-60, March.
    2. repec:eee:tefoso:v:139:y:2019:i:c:p:210-220 is not listed on IDEAS

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