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Relating the Knowledge Production Function to Total Factor Productivity: An Endogenous Growth Puzzle

Author

Listed:
  • Yasser Abdih

    (International Monetary Fund)

  • Frederick Joutz

    (International Monetary Fund)

Abstract

The knowledge production function is central to research and development-based growth models. This paper empirically investigates the knowledge production function and intertemporal spillover effects using cointegration techniques. Timeseries evidence suggests there are two long-run cointegrating relationships. The first captures a long-run knowledge production function; the second captures a long-run positive relationship between total factor productivity (TFP) and the knowledge stock. The results indicate that strong intertemporal knowledge spillovers are present and that the long-run impact of the knowledge stock on TFP is small. This evidence is interpreted in light of existing theoretical and empirical evidence on endogenous growth. Copyright 2006, International Monetary Fund

Suggested Citation

  • Yasser Abdih & Frederick Joutz, 2006. "Relating the Knowledge Production Function to Total Factor Productivity: An Endogenous Growth Puzzle," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 53(2), pages 1-3.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:imfstp:v:53:y:2006:i:2:p:3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sánchez, Marco V. & Cicowiez, Martín, 2014. "Trade-offs and Payoffs of Investing in Human Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 14-29.
    2. Pavel Ciaian & d'Artis Kancs & Julda Kielyte, 2016. "Migration to the EU: Social and Macroeconomic Effects on Sending Countries," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 2016/09, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    3. James B. Ang & Jakob B. Madsen, 2011. "Can Second-Generation Endogenous Growth Models Explain the Productivity Trends and Knowledge Production in the Asian Miracle Economies?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1360-1373, November.
    4. Han, Yoo-Jin, 2007. "Measuring industrial knowledge stocks with patents and papers," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 1(4), pages 269-276.
    5. Beaudreau, Bernard C. & Lightfoot, H. Douglas, 2015. "The physical limits to economic growth by R&D funded innovation," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 45-52.
    6. Pradhan, Jaya Prakash, 2013. "The Geography of Patenting In India: Patterns and Determinants," MPRA Paper 50595, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Samira Hasanzadeh, 2017. "Dissemination of Two Faces of Knowledge: Do Liberal-Democracy and Income-Level Matter?," Carleton Economic Papers 17-09, Carleton University, Department of Economics.
    8. Markus Eberhardt & Francis Teal, 2011. "Econometrics For Grumblers: A New Look At The Literature On Cross‐Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 109-155, February.
    9. Bosetti, Valentina & Cattaneo, Cristina & Verdolini, Elena, 2015. "Migration of skilled workers and innovation: A European Perspective," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 311-322.
    10. Markus Eberhardt & Francis Teal, 2011. "Econometrics For Grumblers: A New Look At The Literature On Cross‐Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 109-155, 02.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • C5 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling

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