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Parental Education and Child Health: Evidence from China


  • Pushkar Maitra
  • Xiujian Peng
  • Yaer Zhuang


This paper examines the effect of parental, household and community character-istics on the health of children in China. We find that birth order, death of elder siblings, use of prenatal care and alcohol consumption by the mother when pregnant have statistically significant effects on the health of children. Although parental education does not have a significant direct effect on child health, it does affect mothers' behavior during pregnancy and inflfluences the use of health inputs, indirectly impacting the health of children. The research findings have important implications for both family planning programs and broader social policies in China. Copyright 2006 East Asian Economic Association.

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  • Pushkar Maitra & Xiujian Peng & Yaer Zhuang, 2006. "Parental Education and Child Health: Evidence from China ," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 47-74, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiaec:v:20:y:2006:i:1:p:47-74

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Juliet Elu & Gregory Price, 2013. "Does Ethnicity Matter for Access to Childhoodand Adolescent Health Capital in China? Evidence from the Wage-Height Relationship in the 2006 China Health and Nutrition Survey," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 315-339, September.

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