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Revisiting South Korea's Import Demand Behavior: A Cointegration Analysis


  • Tuck Cheong Tang


Using cointegration techniques, the present study re-examines the long-run relationships of South Korea's aggregate import demand behavior. The present study considers four domestic activity variables; namely, gross domestic product, gross domestic product minus exports, national cash flow and final expenditure components for aggregate import demand in South Korea. The sample period covers quarterly data from 1970 to 2002. The present study provides empirical evidence of a cointegrating relation in the South Korea's import demand in which it is significant to South Korea's trade policy implication, particularly to improve external balances. Copyright 2005 East Asian Economic Association..

Suggested Citation

  • Tuck Cheong Tang, 2005. "Revisiting South Korea's Import Demand Behavior: A Cointegration Analysis ," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 29-50, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiaec:v:19:y:2005:i:1:p:29-50

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dailami, Mansoor & Han Kim, E., 1995. "The effects of debt subsidies on corporate investment behavior: The Korean experience," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 137-137, May.
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    6. Bruce D. Smith & Michael J. Stutzer, 1989. "Credit Rationing and Government Loan Programs: A Welfare Analysis," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 17(2), pages 177-193.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emmanuel Ziramba, 2007. "Demand For Money And Expenditure Components In South Africa: Assessment From Unrestricted Error-Correction Models," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 75(3), pages 412-424, September.
    2. M. Adetunji Babatunde & Festus O. Egwaikhide, 2010. "Explaining Nigeria's import demand behaviour: a bound testing approach," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 9(2), pages 167-187, July.
    3. Jungho, Baek, 2015. "Empirical Evidence on Korea¡¯s Import Demand Behavior Revisited," Research in Applied Economics, Macrothink Institute, vol. 7(2), pages 11-20, June.
    4. Emmanuel Ziramba, 2008. "Wagner'S Law: An Econometric Test For South Africa, 1960-2006," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 76(4), pages 596-606, December.
    5. Caner COLAK & Selman TOKPUNAR & Yasin UZUN, 2014. "Determinants of Sectoral Import in Manufacturing Industry: A Panel Data Analysis," Ege Academic Review, Ege University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, vol. 14(2), pages 271-281.
    6. Ayg¨¹l Turan, 2015. "Does the Perception of Organizational Cronyism Leads to Career Satisfaction or Frustration with Work? The Mitigating Role of Organizational Commitment," Research in Applied Economics, Macrothink Institute, vol. 7(3), pages 14-30, September.

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