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Gross national happiness

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  • Winton Bates

Abstract

This article considers the concept of gross national happinesss, as it has evolved in Bhutan, against the background of literature on the pursuit of happiness as a government objective and the problems associated with different approaches to measuring well-being. It concludes that since all measures of well-being are imperfect, including the measure of gross national happiness currently being applied in Bhutan, the best approach is to use a range of different measures, including conventional national accounting indicators. Copyright © 2009 The Author. Journal compilation © 2009 Crawford School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd..

Suggested Citation

  • Winton Bates, 2009. "Gross national happiness," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 23(2), pages 1-16, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:apacel:v:23:y:2009:i:2:p:1-16
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8411.2009.01235.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lant Pritchett & Lawrence H. Summers, 1996. "Wealthier is Healthier," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(4), pages 841-868.
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    3. Betsey Stevenson & Justin Wolfers, 2008. "Economic Growth and Subjective Well-Being: Reassessing the Easterlin Paradox," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 39(1 (Spring), pages 1-102.
    4. Dan Haybron, 2007. "Life satisfaction, ethical reflection, and the science of happiness," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 99-138, March.
    5. Daniel Kahneman & Alan B. Krueger, 2006. "Developments in the Measurement of Subjective Well-Being," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 3-24, Winter.
    6. Benjamin M. Friedman, 2006. "Moral Consequences of Economic Growth: The John R. Commons Lecture, 2006," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 50(2), pages 3-8, October.
    7. Bruno S. Frey, 2008. "Happiness: A Revolution in Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262062771, January.
    8. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, 2009. "Should National Happiness be Maximized?," Chapters,in: Happiness, Economics and Politics, chapter 14 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Easterly, William, 1999. "Life during Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 239-276, September.
    10. Amartya Sen, 2000. "A Decade of Human Development," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 17-23.
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    Cited by:

    1. O'Donnell, Gus & Oswald, Andrew J., 2015. "National well-being policy and a weighted approach to human feelings," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 59-70.
    2. N. Wang & M. Kosinski & D. Stillwell & J. Rust, 2014. "Can Well-Being be Measured Using Facebook Status Updates? Validation of Facebook’s Gross National Happiness Index," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 115(1), pages 483-491, January.
    3. Adam Sulkowski & D. Steven White, 2016. "A happiness Kuznets curve? Using model-based cluster analysis to group countries based on happiness, development, income, and carbon emissions," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 1095-1111, August.

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