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The causal relationship between corruption and irresponsible behavior in the time of COVID‐19: Evidence from Tunisia

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  • Walid Gani

Abstract

This paper explores the causal relationship between irresponsible behavior and corruption in Tunisia in the time of COVID‐19. In our modeling approach, the abuse of power is used as a proxy for corruption, while lockdown breaches are used as a proxy for irresponsible behavior. Based on the vector error‐correction model, the Granger causality test is performed to identify the direction of the causal relationship. An empirical study involving the use of real data from the National Anticorruption Authority is conducted. The results reveal the existence of a unidirectional Granger causal relationship running from lockdown breaches to the abuse of power. These findings imply that the irresponsible behavior of Tunisians may constitute in itself a factor that can exacerbate their exposure to corruption in periods of crisis, especially in the absence of well‐established corporate social responsibility. The implications of our findings for public policy are also discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Walid Gani, 2021. "The causal relationship between corruption and irresponsible behavior in the time of COVID‐19: Evidence from Tunisia," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 33(S1), pages 165-176, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:afrdev:v:33:y:2021:i:s1:p:s165-s176
    DOI: 10.1111/1467-8268.12518
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