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Geographic Variation in Health Care: The Role of Private Markets


  • Tomas J. Philipson

    (University of Chicago)

  • Seth A. Seabury

    (RAND Corporation)

  • Lee M. Lockwood

    (University of Chicago)

  • Dana P. Goldman

    (University of Southern California)

  • Darius N. Lakdawalla

    (University of Southern California)


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomas J. Philipson & Seth A. Seabury & Lee M. Lockwood & Dana P. Goldman & Darius N. Lakdawalla, 2010. "Geographic Variation in Health Care: The Role of Private Markets," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 41(1 (Spring), pages 325-361.
  • Handle: RePEc:bin:bpeajo:v:41:y:2010:i:2010-01:p:325-361

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Amitabh Chandra & Douglas O. Staiger, 2007. "Productivity Spillovers in Health Care: Evidence from the Treatment of Heart Attacks," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 103-140.
    2. Kessler, Daniel P. & McClellan, Mark B., 2002. "How liability law affects medical productivity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 931-955, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Deborah Peikes & Stacy Dale & Eric Lundquist & Janice Genevro & David Meyers, 2011. "Building the Evidence Base for the Medical Home: What Sample and Sample Size Do Studies Need?," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 5814eb8219b24982af7f7536c, Mathematica Policy Research.
    2. Amy Finkelstein & Matthew Gentzkow & Heidi Williams, 2016. "Sources of Geographic Variation in Health Care: Evidence From PatientMigration," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 131(4), pages 1681-1726.
    3. Nathan E. Wilson, 2016. "For-profit status and industry evolution in health care markets: evidence from the dialysis industry," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 297-319, December.
    4. Cooper, Zack & Craig, Stuart & Gaynor, Martin & Van Reenen, John, 2015. "The price ain’t right? hospital prices and healthspending on the privately insured," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66059, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Dizioli, Allan & Pinheiro, Roberto, 2016. "Health insurance as a productive factor," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 1-24.
    6. repec:mpr:mprres:7219 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. David Molitor, 2016. "The Evolution of Physician Practice Styles: Evidence from Cardiologist Migration," NBER Working Papers 22478, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Anna A. Levine Taub & Anton Kolotilin & Robert S. Gibbons & Ernst R. Berndt, 2011. "The Diversity of Concentrated Prescribing Behavior: An Application to Antipsychotics," NBER Working Papers 16823, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item


    health care; public sector; Medicare; insurance;


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