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How Much Do We Understand about the Modern Recession?


  • Robert E. Hall

    (Stanford University)


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert E. Hall, 2007. "How Much Do We Understand about the Modern Recession?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 38(2), pages 13-30.
  • Handle: RePEc:bin:bpeajo:v:38:y:2007:i:2007-2:p:13-30

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, July.
    2. Abraham, Katharine G & Katz, Lawrence F, 1986. "Cyclical Unemployment: Sectoral Shifts or Aggregate Disturbances?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 507-522, June.
    3. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
    4. Robert Shimer, 2005. "The Cyclical Behavior of Equilibrium Unemployment and Vacancies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 25-49, March.
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Jordi Galí & Thijs van Rens, 2008. "The vanishing procyclicality of labor productivity," Economics Working Papers 1230, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2010.
    2. Christian Dudel & Mikko Myrskylä, 2016. "Recent trends in US working life expectancy at age 50 by gender, education, and race/ethnicity and the impact of the Great Recession," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2016-006, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    3. Romar Correa, 2010. "Regime-Changes in a Stock-Flow-Consistent Model," Interdisciplinary Description of Complex Systems - scientific journal, Croatian Interdisciplinary Society Provider Homepage:, vol. 8(1), pages 24-33.
    4. Stijn Claessens & M. Ayhan Kose & Marco E. Terrones, 2009. "What happens during recessions, crunches and busts?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 24, pages 653-700, October.
    5. & Hashmat Khan, "undated". "The Shifts in Lead-Lag Properties of the US Business Cycle," Carleton Economic Papers 18-03, Carleton University, Department of Economics.
    6. Yashiv, Eran, 2015. "Capital values and job values," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86323, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Cazes, Sandrine., 2009. "Labour market policies in times of crisis," ILO Working Papers 994341633402676, International Labour Organization.
    8. Eran Yashiv, 2016. "Capital Values and Job Values," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 19, pages 190-209, January.
    9. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0619-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:ilo:ilowps:434163 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Eran Yashiv, 2016. "Capital Values and Job Values," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 19, pages 190-209, January.

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    macroeconomics; Modern Recession;


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