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Agricultural Industrialization: Implications For Economic Development And Public Policy

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  • Drabenstott, Mark

Abstract

Industrialization is rapidly becoming a topic of great attention. Driven by fundamental economic forces, industrialization seems likely to advance ore quickly in the coming decade to more industry segments. By changing the way agriculture does business, industrialization will also bring change to public policy and agricultural institutions. Commodity policy will increasingly be out of step with a product-oriented industry. And as industrialization blurs the lines between producers and processors, land grant universities and the extension service will face challenges assessing who their customers are.

Suggested Citation

  • Drabenstott, Mark, 1995. "Agricultural Industrialization: Implications For Economic Development And Public Policy," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 27(01), July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:15325
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/15325
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Drabenstott, Mark, 1994. "Industrialization: Steady Current or Tidal Wave?," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 9(4).
    2. Alan Barkema, 1993. "Reaching Consumers in the Twenty-First Century: The Short Way Around the Barn," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 75(5), pages 1126-1131.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kherallah, Mylene & Kirsten, Johann F, 2002. "The New Institutional Economics: Applications For Agricultural Policy Research In Developing Countries," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 41(2), June.
    2. Paul Huddleston, 2011. "Contract Farming and Technology Transfer: Perspectives from the Philippines’ Oil Palm Industry," Chapters,in: Globalisation, Agriculture and Development, chapter 10 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Hudson, Darren & Jones, Tom, 2000. "Marketing Practices And Market Channel Utilization By Mississippi Soybean Producers," Research reports 15795, Mississippi State University, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    4. Yi Peng & Liyin Shen & Cong Tan & Dalu Tan & Hao Wang, 2013. "Critical determinant factors (CDFs) for developing concentrated rural settlement in post-disaster reconstruction: a China study," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 66(2), pages 355-373, March.
    5. Hudson, Darren, 2001. "Cross-Commodity Perspective On Contracting: Evidence From Mississippi," Research reports 15800, Mississippi State University, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    6. Kherallah, Mylène & Kirsten, Johann, 2001. "The new institutional economics," MSSD discussion papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Ahearn, Mary Clare & Korb, Penelope J. & Banker, David E., 2005. "Industrialization and Contracting in U.S. Agriculture," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 37(02), August.
    8. Ng, Desmond & Chen, Liming, 2016. "Learning to Learn: A Case for the Heterogeneous Expectations Hypothesis in Industrialized Markets," International Journal on Food System Dynamics, International Center for Management, Communication, and Research, vol. 7(3).

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