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State-Contingent Demand for Herbicide-Tolerance Seed Trait

  • Hennessy, David A.
  • Saak, Alexander E.

Suppose a farmer had to apply a herbicide pre-emergence or not at all. The advent of a herbicide-tolerance trait innovation then provides the option to wait for more information before making a state-contingent post-emergence application. This option to wait can increase or decrease average herbicide use. For heterogeneous acre types, trait royalties increase with the level of uncertainty about the extent of weed damage. Royalties are largest when acre infestation susceptibility types are bunched around the type indifferent to applying the herbicide in the absence of the trait. The trait complements (substitutes for) information technologies that facilitate informed post-emergence (pre-emergence) decisions.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/30723
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Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 28 (2003)
Issue (Month): 01 (April)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:30723
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://waeaonline.org/

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