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Sources Of Productivity Growth During The Transition To Alternative Cropping Systems

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  • Jaenicke, Edward C.
  • Drinkwater, Laurie E.

Abstract

Traditional measures of productivity growth may not fully account for all sources of growth during the transition from conventional to alternative cropping systems. This paper treats soil quality as part of the production process and incorporates it directly into rotational measures of productivity growth. An application to data from an experimental cropping system in Pennsylvania suggests that both experimental learning and soil-quality improvements were important sources of growth during the system's transition.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaenicke, Edward C. & Drinkwater, Laurie E., 1999. "Sources Of Productivity Growth During The Transition To Alternative Cropping Systems," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 28(2), October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:31284
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/31284
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fare,Rolf & Grosskopf,Shawna & Lovell,C. A. Knox, 2008. "Production Frontiers," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521072069, March.
    2. Tauer, Loren W. & Hanchar, John J., 1995. "Nonparametric Technical Efficiency With K Firms, N Inputs, And M Outputs: A Simulation," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 24(2), October.
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    6. Chambers,Robert G., 1988. "Applied Production Analysis," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521314275, March.
    7. Bhalla, Surjit S., 1988. "Does land quality matter? : Theory and measurement," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 45-62, July.
    8. Benjamin, Dwayne, 1995. "Can unobserved land quality explain the inverse productivity relationship?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 51-84, February.
    9. Diewert, W. E., 1976. "Exact and superlative index numbers," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 115-145, May.
    10. V. Eldon Ball & Jean-Christophe Bureau & Richard Nehring & Agapi Somwaru, 1997. "Agricultural Productivity Revisited," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1045-1063.
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    Keywords

    Productivity Analysis;

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