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Exploring the willingness to pay for forest ecosystem services by residents of the Veneto Region

Author

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  • Gatto, Paola
  • Vidale, Enrico
  • Secco, Laura
  • Pettenella, Davide

Abstract

Forests produce a wide array of goods, both private and public. The demand for forest ecosystem services is increasing in many European countries, yet there is still a scarcity of data on values at regional scale for Alpine areas. A Choice Experiment survey has been conducted in order to explore preferences, uses and the willingness of the Veneto population to pay for ecosystem services produced by regional mountain forests. The results show that willingness to pay is significant for recreation and C-sequestration but not for biodiversity conservation, landscape and other ecosystem services. These findings question the feasibility of developing market-based mechanisms in Veneto at present and cast light on the possible role of public institutions in promoting policy actions to increase the general awareness of forest-related ecosystem services.

Suggested Citation

  • Gatto, Paola & Vidale, Enrico & Secco, Laura & Pettenella, Davide, 2014. "Exploring the willingness to pay for forest ecosystem services by residents of the Veneto Region," Bio-based and Applied Economics Journal, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA), issue 1, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aieabj:172413
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/172413
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chatzinikolaou, Parthena & Raggi, Meri & Viaggi, Davide, 0. "The evaluation of Ecosystem Services production: an application in the Province of Ferrara," Bio-based and Applied Economics Journal, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA), issue 3.
    2. Secco, Laura & Abatangelo, Chiara & Pisani, Elena & Gallo, Diego & Pettenella, Davide & Gatto, Paola & Dare, Riccardo & Vidale, Enrico, 2015. "Innovating rural resources governance through new policy instruments: the case of “network contracts”," 2015 Fourth Congress, June 11-12, 2015, Ancona, Italy 207845, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Payments for Ecosystem Services; choice experiments; multi-nomial logit; latent class models; Environmental Economics and Policy; Land Economics/Use; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy; Q23; Q56;

    JEL classification:

    • Q23 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Forestry
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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