IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Protected areas in fisheries: a two-patch, two-species model


  • Greenville, Jared W.
  • MacAulay, T. Gordon


The use of marine protected areas as a fishery management tool has been suggested as a hedge against management failures and variation in harvests. A stochastic bioeconomic model of a hypothetical predator–prey fishery is used to test the performance of protected areas in a fishery with heterogenous environments. Protected areas are analysed under density-dependent and sink-source dispersal relationships between the subpopulations that occur within the fishery. Differing management structures governing resource extraction are analysed. The focus of the study is placed on the biological and management characteristics that yield benefits to both fishers and society. It is shown that the establishment of a protected area improves fishery rent and lowers harvest variation. This result is sensitive to both current management controls and the correlation between species and patches.

Suggested Citation

  • Greenville, Jared W. & MacAulay, T. Gordon, 2006. "Protected areas in fisheries: a two-patch, two-species model," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 50(2), June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:116924

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bulte, Erwin H. & van Kooten, G. Cornelis, 2001. "Harvesting and conserving a species when numbers are low: population viability and gambler's ruin in bioeconomic models," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 87-100, April.
    2. R. Quentin Grafton & Pham Van Ha & Tom Kompas, 2004. "Saving the Seas: The Economic Justification for Marine Reserves," Economics and Environment Network Working Papers 0402, Australian National University, Economics and Environment Network.
    3. Wolfgang Ströbele & Holger Wacker, 1995. "The economics of harvesting predator-prey systems," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 61(1), pages 65-81, February.
    4. Grafton, R. Quentin & Kompas, Tom, 2005. "Uncertainty and the active adaptive management of marine reserves," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 471-479, September.
    5. Sanchirico, James & Wilen, James, 2000. "The Impacts of Marine Reserves on Limited-Entry Fisheries," Discussion Papers dp-00-34, Resources For the Future.
    6. Sanchirico, James N. & Wilen, James E., 2001. "A Bioeconomic Model of Marine Reserve Creation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 257-276, November.
    7. Pezzey, John C. V. & Roberts, Callum M. & Urdal, Bjorn T., 2000. "A simple bioeconomic model of a marine reserve," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 77-91, April.
    8. Sanchirico, James N., 2005. "Additivity properties in metapopulation models: implications for the assessment of marine reserves," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 1-25, January.
    9. Bulte, Erwin H. & van Kooten, G. Cornelis, 1999. "Metapopulation dynamics and stochastic bioeconomic modeling," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 293-299, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ecomod:v:256:y:2013:i:c:p:69-84 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Greenville, Jared W. & MacAulay, T. Gordon, 2006. "Protected Areas and the Management of Fisheries: An Institutional Perspective," 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia 139739, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:116924. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.