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The Greenhouse Debate: Econonmic Efficiency, Burden Sharing and Hedging Strategies

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  • Alan Manne
  • Richard Richels

Abstract

We address the issue of economic efficiency as it relates to climate change. We begin with a classical cost-benefit perspective. Mat is, we focus on emission trajectories which maximize net benefits. We then examine the consequences of adopting alternative decision making paradigms-for example, those based on limiting atmospheric concentrations so as to achieve an "ample margin of safety." We also consider the regional distribution of costs and benefits under alternative burden sharing schemes. Although the climate issue is often viewed from a global perspective, international negotiators will be acutely interested in how damages and mitigation costs might be distributed among individual regions. Finally, we address the issue of decision making under uncertainty. The challenge confronting today's policy makers is to identify it sensible hedging strategy-one that balances the risks of waiting against those of premature action.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan Manne & Richard Richels, 1995. "The Greenhouse Debate: Econonmic Efficiency, Burden Sharing and Hedging Strategies," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 1-38.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:1995v16-04-a01
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    Cited by:

    1. Bollen, Johannes & Hers, Sebastiaan & van der Zwaan, Bob, 2010. "An integrated assessment of climate change, air pollution, and energy security policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 4021-4030, August.
    2. Zhang, ZhongXiang & Folmer, Henk, 1998. "Economic modelling approaches to cost estimates for the control of carbon dioxide emissions1," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 101-120, February.
    3. Manne, Alan & Richels, Richard, 1996. "The Berlin Mandate: The costs of meeting post-2000 targets and timetables," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 205-210, March.
    4. Manne, Alan S. & Stephan, Gunter, 1999. "Climate-change policies and international rate-of-return differentials," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 309-316, June.
    5. Valentina Bosetti & Carlo Carraro & Enrica De Cian & Romain Duval & Emanuele Massetti & Massimo Tavoni, 2009. "The Incentives to Participate in and the Stability of International Climate Coalitions: A Game-Theoretic Approach Using the WITCH Model," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 702, OECD Publishing.
    6. Dietz, Simon, 2009. "From efficiency to justice: utility as the informational basis of climate change strategies, and some alternatives," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 37616, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Wei, Yi-Ming & Mi, Zhi-Fu & Huang, Zhimin, 2015. "Climate policy modeling: An online SCI-E and SSCI based literature review," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 57(PA), pages 70-84.
    8. Peterson, Sonja, 2006. "Uncertainty and economic analysis of climate change: a survey of approaches and findings," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 3778, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    9. Ingham, Alan & Ma, Jie & Ulph, Alistair, 2007. "Climate change, mitigation and adaptation with uncertainty and learning," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5354-5369, November.
    10. Frankhauser, Samuel & Tol, Richard SJ, 1996. "Climate change costs : Recent advancements in the economic assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(7), pages 665-673, July.
    11. Kelly, David L. & Kolstad, Charles D., 2001. "Malthus and Climate Change: Betting on a Stable Population," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 135-161, March.
    12. Kanudia, Amit & Loulou, Richard, 1998. "Robust responses to climate change via stochastic MARKAL: The case of Quebec," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 15-30, April.
    13. Masako Ikefuji & Jan Magnus & Hiroaki Sakamoto, 2014. "The effect of health benefits on climate change mitigation policies," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 126(1), pages 229-243, September.
    14. Yohe, Gary & Malinowski, Tricia & Yohe, Marielle, 1998. "Fixing global carbon emissions: choosing the best target year," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 219-231, February.
    15. Nebojsa Nakicenovic & Peter Kolp & Keywan Riahi & Mikiko Kainuma & Tatsuya Hanaoka, 2006. "Assessment of emissions scenarios revisited," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 7(3), pages 137-173, September.
    16. Peterson, Sonja, 2004. "The contribution of economics to the analysis of climate change and uncertainty: a survey of approaches and findings," Kiel Working Papers 1212, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    17. Simon Dietz, 2009. "From efficiency to justice: utility as the informational basis of climate change strategies, and some alternatives," GRI Working Papers 13, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    18. Akihiro Amano, 1998. "Climate change, response timing, and integrated assessment modeling," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 1(1), pages 3-18, June.
    19. Jaccard, Mark & Rivers, Nic, 2007. "Heterogeneous capital stocks and the optimal timing for CO2 abatement," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 1-16, January.
    20. Ford, Melanie & Matysek, Anna & Jakeman, Guy & Gurney, Andrew & Fisher, Brian S., 2006. "Perspectives on international climate policy," 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia 137963, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    21. Herring, Horace, 1999. "Does energy efficiency save energy? The debate and its consequences," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 209-226, July.
    22. Heintz, Roebyem J & Tol, Richard SJ, 1995. "Joint implementation and uniform mixing," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(10), pages 911-917, October.
    23. Grubb, Michael, 1997. "Technologies, energy systems and the timing of CO2 emissions abatement : An overview of economic issues," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 159-172, February.

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General

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