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Africa's Economic Performance: Limitations of the Current Consensus

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  • John Sender

Abstract

Historical and micro-survey evidence, as well as the standard data from international organizations, support less pessimistic conclusions on Africa's development performance than those reached by many social scientists. The changes that have benefited women over the last four decades are highlighted; a discussion of growth in agricultural production follows. However, the complexity and the brutality of processes of social and economic change in Sub-Saharan African economies are also stressed. The theoretical implications of these complexities have not been adequately analyzed by World Bank economists. The Bank's recent efforts to reassess its policies are, therefore, unlikely to achieve the results anticipated.

Suggested Citation

  • John Sender, 1999. "Africa's Economic Performance: Limitations of the Current Consensus," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 89-114, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:13:y:1999:i:3:p:89-114
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.13.3.89
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.13.3.89
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. V. Heinrich Amavilah, 2003. "Meditating on "Slow Growth in Africa" - New Evidence or Just Ol' Stuff?," Development and Comp Systems 0307003, EconWPA.
    2. Khaled Elmawazini & Sonny Nwankwo, 2013. "Globalisation and Income Gap between Rich and Poor Nations," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 18(2), pages 19-40, September.
    3. Hlavac, Marek, 2007. "Determinants of Multilateral Official Development Assistance: Evidence from a Panel Study of Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 24243, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Rudiger von Arnim, 2008. "Economic liberalization and constraints to development in sub-Saharan africa," Working Papers 67, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    5. Fosu, Augustin Kwasi, 2013. "Achieving Development Success: Strategies and Lessons from the Developing World," WIDER Working Paper Series 027, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Gareth Austin, 2008. "Resources, techniques, and strategies south of the Sahara: revising the factor endowments perspective on African economic development, 1500-2000 -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(3), pages 587-624, August.
    7. Peter Gordon & Wendell Cox, 2014. "Modern cities: their role and their private planning roots," Chapters,in: Cities and Private Planning, chapter 8, pages 155-173 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. John Sender, 2000. "Struggles To Escape Poverty In South Africa: Results From A Purposive Rural Survey," Working Papers 107, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
    9. Yuan K. Chou & Hayat Khan, 2004. "Explaining Africa's Growth Tragedy: A Theoretical Model of Dictatorship and Kleptocracy," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 922, The University of Melbourne.
    10. Gareth Austin & Ewout Frankema & Ewout Morten Jerven, 2015. "Patterns of Manufacturing Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: From Colonization to the Present," Working Papers 0071, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    11. Bichaka Fayissa, 2001. "The determinants of infant and child mortality in developing countries: The case of Sub-Sahara Africa," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 83-98, December.
    12. Augustin Kwasi Fosu, 2010. "Africa's Economic Future: Learning from the Past," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 11(1), pages 62-71, April.
    13. Moradi, Alexander, 2010. "Nutritional status and economic development in sub-Saharan Africa, 1950-1980," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 16-29, March.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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