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Homo Economicus Goes to War: Methodological Individualism, Rational Choice and the Political Economy of War

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  • Cramer, C.

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  • Cramer, C., 2002. "Homo Economicus Goes to War: Methodological Individualism, Rational Choice and the Political Economy of War," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 1845-1864, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:30:y:2002:i:11:p:1845-1864
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    3. Miguel Székely & Marianne Hilgert, 1999. "What's Behind the Inequality We Measure: An Investigation Using Latin American Data," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6458, Inter-American Development Bank.
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    6. Collier, Paul & Hoeffler, Anke, 1998. "On Economic Causes of Civil War," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(4), pages 563-573, October.
    7. Hugh Neary, 1997. "A comparison of rent-seeking models and economic models of conflict," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 93(3), pages 373-388, December.
    8. Frances Stewart, 2000. "Crisis Prevention: Tackling Horizontal Inequalities," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(3), pages 245-262.
    9. Peter Wallensteen & Margareta Sollenberg, 1998. "Armed Conflict and Regional Conflict Complexes, 1989-97," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 35(5), pages 621-634, September.
    10. Leamer, Edward E, 1983. "Let's Take the Con Out of Econometrics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 31-43, March.
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    12. repec:fth:oxesaf:2001-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Arrow, Kenneth J, 1994. "Methodological Individualism and Social Knowledge," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 1-9, May.
    14. Neary, Hugh M, 1997. "A Comparison of Rent-Seeking Models and Economic Models of Conflict," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 93(3-4), pages 373-388, December.
    15. Nafziger, E.W., 1996. "The Economics of Complex Humanitarian Emergencies: Preliminary Approaches and Findings," Research Paper 119, World Institute for Development Economics Research.
    16. Grossman, Herschel I, 1991. "A General Equilibrium Model of Insurrections," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 912-921, September.
    17. Andre, Catherine & Platteau, Jean-Philippe, 1998. "Land relations under unbearable stress: Rwanda caught in the Malthusian trap," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 1-47, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mehrdad Vahabi, 2017. "A critical survey of the resource curse literature through the appropriability lens," CEPN Working Papers 2017-14, Centre d'Economie de l'Université de Paris Nord.
    2. Benedikt Korf, 2007. "Contract or war? On the rules of the game in civil wars," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 685-694.
    3. Christopher Blattman & Edward Miguel, 2009. "Civil War: A Review of Fifty Years of Research," Working Papers id:2231, eSocialSciences.
    4. Silvia Amaral & Tomaz Dentinho, 2005. "The development of the Huambo Province in Angola - The application of a spatial interaction model to simulate the movement from autarky to external integration," ERSA conference papers ersa05p252, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Thomas Gries & Claus-Jochen Haake, 2016. "An Economic Theory of 'Destabilization War'," Working Papers CIE 95, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.
    6. Adedokun, Ayokunu, 2017. "Post-conflict peacebuilding: A critical survey of the literature and avenues for future research," MERIT Working Papers 016, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    7. Moshik Lavie & Christophe Muller, 2011. "Incentives and Survival in Violent Conflicts," Research Working Papers 47, MICROCON - A Micro Level Analysis of Violent Conflict.
    8. Mac Ginty, Roger, 2013. "Indicators+: A proposal for everyday peace indicators," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 56-63.
    9. Gutiérrez Sanín, Francisco & González Peña, Andrea, 2009. "Force and ambiguity: evaluating sources for cross-national research – the case of military interventions," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28494, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Ugo Pagano, 2013. "Love, war and cultures: an institutional approach to human evolution," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 41-66, April.
    11. Michael J. Gilligan, 2016. "Employment and rebellion in conflicted and fragile states," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 271-271, June.
    12. Goodhand, Jonathan, 2003. "Enduring Disorder and Persistent Poverty: A Review of the Linkages Between War and Chronic Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 629-646, March.
    13. Christopher Cramer, 2003. "Does inequality cause conflict?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 397-412.
    14. Brenner, David, 2015. "Ashes of co-optation: from armed group fragmentation to the rebuilding of popular insurgency in Myanmar," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65546, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    15. Christopher Blattman & Edward Miguel, 2010. "Civil War," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(1), pages 3-57, March.
    16. Gries, Thomas & Haake, Claus-Jochen, 2016. "An Economic Theory of 'Destabilization War' '- Compromise for Peace versus Conventional, Guerilla, or Terrorist Warfare," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145617, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    17. David M Malone & Heiko Nitzschke, 2010. "Economic Agendas in Civil Wars: What We Know, What We Need to Know," Working Papers id:3226, eSocialSciences.
    18. Frances Stewart, "undated". "Global Economic Influences and Policies towards Violent Self-Determination Movements: An Overview," QEH Working Papers qehwps98, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    19. Horatiu Rus, 2014. "Corruption, conflict and the management of natural resources," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 355-386, November.
    20. Van Leeuwen, Mathijs & Van Der Haar, Gemma, 2016. "Theorizing the Land–Violent Conflict Nexus," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 94-104.
    21. Fjelde, Hanne, 2015. "Farming or Fighting? Agricultural Price Shocks and Civil War in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 525-534.

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