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Gender Differences in the Labor-Market Effects of the Dollar


  • Linda Goldberg
  • Joseph Tracy


Although the dollar has been shown to influence the expected wages of workers, the analysis to date has focused on the male workforce. We show that exchange rate fluctuations also have important implications for women's wages. The dominant wage effects for women—like those for men—arise at times of job transition. Changes in the value of the dollar can cause the wage gap between women who change jobs and women who stay on in their jobs to expand or contract sharply, with the most pronounced effects occurring among the least educated women and women in highly competitive manufacturing industries. In addition, it appears that women who stay on in their jobs show greater wage sensitivity to currency movements than do their male counterparts.
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Suggested Citation

  • Linda Goldberg & Joseph Tracy, 2001. "Gender Differences in the Labor-Market Effects of the Dollar," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 400-405, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:91:y:2001:i:2:p:400-405 Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.91.2.400

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Linda S. Goldberg & Joseph Tracy, 2001. "Exchange rates and wages," Staff Reports 116, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    2. Topel, Robert H, 1986. "Local Labor Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 111-143, June.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions


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