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Why Are Women Such Reluctant Economists? Evidence from Liberal Arts Colleges


  • Ann L. Owen
  • Elizabeth J. Jensen


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Ann L. Owen & Elizabeth J. Jensen, 2000. "Why Are Women Such Reluctant Economists? Evidence from Liberal Arts Colleges," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 466-470, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:90:y:2000:i:2:p:466-470 Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.90.2.466

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Robin L. Bartlett, 1996. "Discovering Diversity in Introductory Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 141-153, Spring.
    2. Karen E. Dynan & Cecilia Elena Rouse, 1997. "The Underrepresentation of Women in Economics: A Study of Undergraduate Economics Students," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 350-368, December.
    3. Elizabeth J. Jensen & Ann L. Owen, 2001. "Pedagogy, Gender, and Interest in Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 323-343, January.
    4. Feiner, Susan & Roberts, Bruce, 1995. "Using Alternative Paradigms to Teach about Race and Gender: A Critical Thinking Approach to Introductory Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 367-371, May.
    5. Ferber, Marianne A, 1995. "The Study of Economics: A Feminist Critique," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 357-361, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew C. Worthington & Helen Higgs, 2000. "Student Perceptions of the Profession and the Decision to Major in Economics," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 085, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    2. Ann L. Owen, 2010. "Grades, Gender, and Encouragement: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(3), pages 217-234, June.
    3. Andrew Worthington & Helen Higgs, 2003. "Factors explaining the choice of a finance major: the role of students' characteristics, personality and perceptions of the profession," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 1-21.
    4. Ray Bachan & Michael Barrow, 2006. "Modelling Curriculum Choice at A-level: Why is Business Studies More Popular than Economics?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 5(2), pages 58-80.
    5. Rask, Kevin, 2010. "Attrition in STEM fields at a liberal arts college: The importance of grades and pre-collegiate preferences," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 892-900, December.
    6. Hunjra, Ahmed Imran & Rehman, Kashif-Ur- & Ahmad, Abrar & Safwan, Nadeem & Rehman, Ijaz-Ur, 2009. "Factors explaining the choice of finance major: students’ perception towards finance profession," MPRA Paper 40687, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Rask, Kevin & Tiefenthaler, Jill, 2008. "The role of grade sensitivity in explaining the gender imbalance in undergraduate economics," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 676-687, December.
    8. repec:ebl:ecbull:eb-17-00163 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Fred H. Smith & Christina Zenker, 2014. "Still staying away: Women and the economics major – evidence from two Southern liberal arts colleges," Econometrics Letters, Bilimsel Mektuplar Organizasyonu (Scientific letters), vol. 1(2), pages 1-7.
    10. Charles Ballard & Marianne Johnson, 2005. "Gender, Expectations, And Grades In Introductory Microeconomics At A Us University," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1), pages 95-122.
    11. Adriana D. Kugler & Catherine H. Tinsley & Olga Ukhaneva, 2017. "Choice of Majors: Are Women Really Different from Men?," NBER Working Papers 23735, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Kugler, Adriana & Tinsley, Catherine H. & Ukhaneva, Olga, 2017. "Choice of Majors: Are Women Really Different from Men?," IZA Discussion Papers 10947, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate


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