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Discovering Diversity in Introductory Economics

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  • Robin L. Bartlett

Abstract

Instructors can begin the process of integrating race and gender issues into introductory economics by reexamining their courses with a new lens of diversity. The content of introductory economics can be expanded by 'adding and stirring' race and gender data from standard statistical sources or from the students themselves. This paper offers some 'add-and-stir' macro- and microeconomic examples. To discover the appropriate mix of these examples and how to present them, this paper also offers ways of getting to know who your students are and how better to teach them with their diverse interests and learning styles.

Suggested Citation

  • Robin L. Bartlett, 1996. "Discovering Diversity in Introductory Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 141-153, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:10:y:1996:i:2:p:141-53
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.10.2.141
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.10.2.141
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arthur Lewis, W., 1988. "The roots of development theory," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 27-37 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:

    1. Robin L. Bartlett, 1998. "CSWEP: 25 Years at a Time," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 177-183, Fall.
    2. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:1:y:2007:i:2:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ann L. Owen & Elizabeth J. Jensen, 2000. "Why Are Women Such Reluctant Economists? Evidence from Liberal Arts Colleges," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 466-470, May.
    4. Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2003. "Do Women and Non-economists Add Diversity to Research in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics?," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 575-591, Fall.
    5. Scott Simkins & Stuart Allen, 2001. "Are learning outcomes in economics different at predominantly black and white universities? Lessons fromPrinciples of macroeconomics courses at two schools," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 28(3), pages 23-39, December.
    6. Perry Patterson, 1998. "Including Gays and Lesbians in the Economic Curriculum," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 65-72.
    7. Mary Lopez, 2009. "Incorporating Service-Learning into the Economics Curriculum," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 137-149, June.
    8. Jeffrey Wagner, 2007. "Plato's Republic and liberal economic education for the twenty-first century," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 1(2), pages 1-10.
    9. Robin L. Bartlett, 2011. "Integrating Race, Gender and Class," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 20 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate

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