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Do Women and Non-economists Add Diversity to Research in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics?

Author

Listed:
  • Joyce P. Jacobsen

    () (Department of Economics, Wesleyan University)

Abstract

We examine whether interdisciplinary collaboration and the gender diversity of a profession affect scholarly research practices. Our analysis of four industrial relations and labor economics journals shows that decisions to exclude women and minorities, and to use gender or race as explanatory variables, are influenced by authors' gender and disciplinary training. Woman authors are less likely to exclude women from their sample, and non-economists are less likely to exclude women and minorities. While noneconomists are generally less likely to model gender and race explicitly in their empirical work, their statistical methods become more elaborate when they collaborate with economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2003. "Do Women and Non-economists Add Diversity to Research in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics?," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 575-591, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:29:y:2003:i:4:p:575-591
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    File URL: http://web.holycross.edu/RePEc/eej/Archive/Volume29/V29N4P575_591.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robin L. Bartlett, 1996. "Discovering Diversity in Introductory Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 141-153.
    2. Veall, Michael R & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1996. " Pseudo-R-[superscript 2] Measures for Some Common Limited Dependent Variable Models," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(3), pages 241-259, September.
    3. David Neumark & Rosella Gardecki, 1998. "Women Helping Women? Role Model and Mentoring Effects on Female Ph.D. Students in Economics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, pages 220-246.
    4. Joyce Jacobsen & Andrew Newman, 1997. "What Data Do Economists Use? The Case of Labor Economics and Industrial Relations," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 127-130.
    5. David Neumark & Rosella Gardecki, 1998. "Women Helping Women? Role Model and Mentoring Effects on Female Ph.D. Students in Economics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, pages 220-246.
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    Cited by:

    1. Butler, Daniel M. & Butler, Richard J., 2011. "The Internet's effect on women's coauthoring rates and academic job market decisions: The case of political science," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 665-672, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics Journals; Economics; Economists; Gender; Journals; Labor Economics; Minorities; Women;

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics

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