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The Returns to Pencil Use Revisited

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  • Spitz-Oener, Alexandra

Abstract

The increased diffusion of computers is one of the fundamental changes at workplaces in recent decades. While the majority of workers now spend a substantial fraction of their working day with a computer, research on the wage effect of computer use effectively came to a halt after DiNardo and Pischke [1997] found that wages were also positively associated with pencil use, calling into question the ability to distinguish the effect of computers from other confounding factors. Using the same data set as DiNardo and Pischke, but a more recent wave, this paper revitalizes the discussion by showing that the pencil effect disappeared in 1998/99, whereas the computer effect is still present. Computer users - but not pencil users - have experienced a pronounced shift towards analytical and interactive tasks, for which they are rewarded in the workplace. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research in its series ZEW Discussion Papers with number 07-020.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:5508

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Keywords: Computer wage differential; pencil wage differentials; changing skill requirements;

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  1. Dinardo, J.E. & Pischke, J.S., 1996. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," Working papers 96-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Nathalie Chusseau & Michel Dumont, 2012. "Growing Income Inequalities in Advanced," Working Papers hal-00993359, HAL.
  2. Katja Görlitz & Marcus Tamm, 2011. "Revisiting the Complementarity between Education and Training – The Role of Personality, Working Tasks and Firm Effects," Ruhr Economic Papers 0307, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  3. Regula Geel & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2009. "Occupational Mobility Within and Between Skill Clusters: An Empirical Analysis Based on the Skill-Weights Approach," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0047, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  4. Nathalie Chusseau & Michel Dumont, 2012. "Growing income inequalities in advanced countries," Working Papers 260, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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