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Fringe Benefits and Job Satisfaction

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  • Benjamin Artz

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    (Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee)

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    Abstract

    Fringe benefits stand as an important part of compensation but confirming their role in determining job satisfaction has been mixed at best. The theory suggesting this role is ambiguous. Fringe benefits represent a desirable form of compensation but might result in decreased earnings and reduced job mobility. Using a pooled cross-section of five NLSY waves, fringe benefits are established as significant positive determinants of job satisfaction, even after controlling for individual fixed effects and testing for the endogeneity of fringe benefits.

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    File URL: http://www.uww.edu/documents/colleges/cobe/economics/wpapers/08_03_Artz.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by UW-Whitewater, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 08-03.

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    Length: 37 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:uww:wpaper:08-03

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    Postal: Whitewater, WI 53190-1750
    Phone: (414) 472-1361
    Web page: http://www.uww.edu/cobe/economics/main.html
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    8. Clive Belfield & R. D. F. Harris, 2002. "How well do theories of job matching explain variations in job satisfaction across education levels? Evidence for UK graduates," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(5), pages 535-548.
    9. Andrew A. Luchak & Ian R. Gellatly, 2002. "How Pension Accrual Affects Job Satisfaction ," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 23(1), pages 145-162, January.
    10. Keith A. Bender & John S. Heywood, 2006. "Job Satisfaction Of The Highly Educated: The Role Of Gender, Academic Tenure, And Earnings," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 53(2), pages 253-279, 05.
    11. McCausland, David & Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Theodossiou, Ioannis, 2005. "Some are Punished and Some are Rewarded: A Study of the Impact of Performance Pay on Job Satisfaction," MPRA Paper 14243, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Jose Cabral Vieira & Antonio Menezes & Patricia Gabriel, 2005. "Low pay, higher pay and job quality: empirical evidence for Portugal," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(8), pages 505-511.
    13. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen, 1988. "Job Switching and Job Satisfaction in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(2), pages 495-594.
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