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School accountability and teacher mobility

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  • Li Feng
  • David N. Figlio
  • Tim Sass

Abstract

This paper presents the first causal evidence on the effects of school accountability systems on teacher labor markets. We exploit a 2002 change in Florida's school accountability system that exogenously shocked some schools to higher accountability grades and others to lower accountability grades, and measure whether teachers in shocked schools are more or less likely to move. Using microdata from the universe of Florida public school teachers, we find strong evidence that accountability shocks influence the teacher labor market; specifically, teachers are more likely to leave schools that have been downward shocked -- especially to the bottom grade -- and they are less likely to leave schools that have been upward shocked. We also find that accountability shocks influence the distribution of the measured quality of teachers (in terms of value added measures) who stay and leave their school, though the average differences are not large.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w16070.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16070.

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Date of creation: Jun 2010
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Publication status: published as "School Accountability" (with Susanna Loeb) in E. Hanushek, S. Machin, and L. Woessmann, eds., Handbook of Economics of Education , volume 3, Elsevier, 2011.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16070

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Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
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Cited by:
  1. Jonah Rockoff & Lesley J. Turner, 2010. "Short-Run Impacts of Accountability on School Quality," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 2(4), pages 119-47, November.
  2. Karbownik, Krzysztof, 2014. "Do changes in student quality affect teacher mobility? Evidence from an admission reform," Working Paper Series 2014:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  3. Stuit, David A. & Smith, Thomas M., 2012. "Explaining the gap in charter and traditional public school teacher turnover rates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 268-279.
  4. Elizabeth Davidson & Randall Reback & Jonah E. Rockoff & Heather L. Schwartz, 2013. "Fifty Ways to Leave a Child Behind: Idiosyncrasies and Discrepancies in States’ Implementation of NCLB," NBER Working Papers 18988, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Roel van Elk & Suzanne Kok, 2014. "The impact of a comprehensive school reform policy for failing schools on educational achievement; Results of the first four years," CPB Discussion Paper 264, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

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