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Carrot or Stick? Group Selection and the Evolution of Reciprocal Preferences

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  • Herold, Florian
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    Abstract

    This paper studies the evolution of both characteristics of reciprocity - the willingness to reward friendly behavior and the willingness to punish hostile behavior. Firstly, preferences for rewarding as well as preferences for punishing can survive evolution provided individuals interact within separated groups. This holds even with randomly formed groups and even when individual preferences are unobservable. Secondly, preferences for rewarding survive only in coexistence with self-interested preferences. But preferences for punishing tend either to vanish or to dominate the population entirely. Finally, the evolution of preferences for rewarding and the evolution of preferences for punishing influence each other decisively. The existence of rewarders enhances the evolutionary success of punishers, but punishers crowd out rewarders.

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    File URL: http://epub.ub.uni-muenchen.de/40/1/carrot_or_stick_june03.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Munich, Department of Economics in its series Discussion Papers in Economics with number 40.

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    Date of creation: Jul 2003
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    Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenec:40

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    Keywords: Reciprocity ; Evolution of Preferences ; Group Selection ; Coevolution ; Fairness;

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    Cited by:
    1. Ellingsen, Tore & Johannesson, Magnus, 2005. "Sunk costs and fairness in incomplete information bargaining," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 155-177, February.

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