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The Effect of Public Sector Employment on Local Labour Markets

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  • Giulia Faggio
  • Henry G. Overman

Abstract

This paper considers the impact of public sector employment on local labour markets. Using English data at the Local Authority level for 2003 to 2007 we find that public sector employment has no identifiable effect on total private sector employment. However, public sector employment does affect the sectoral composition of the private sector. Specifically, each additional public sector job creates 0.5 jobs in the nontradable sector (construction and services) while crowding out 0.4 jobs in the tradable sector (manufacturing). When using data for a longer time period (1999 to 2007) we find no multiplier effect for nontradables, stronger crowding out for tradables and, consistent with this, crowding out for total private sector employment.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE in its series SERC Discussion Papers with number 0111.

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Date of creation: Jun 2012
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Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0111

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Web page: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp

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Keywords: Local labour markets; public and private sector employment; wages;

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Cited by:
  1. Dauth, Wolfgang & Findeisen, Sebastian & Suedekum, Jens, 2012. "The Rise of the East and the Far East: German Labor Markets and Trade Integration," IZA Discussion Papers 6685, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Max Nathan, 2011. "Ethnic Inventors, Diversity and Innovation in the UK: Evidence from Patents Microdata," SERC Discussion Papers 0092, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  3. Giulia Faggio, 2014. "Relocation of Public Sector Workers: Evaluating a Place-based Policy," SERC Discussion Papers 0155, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.

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