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Linking Land Quality, Agricultural Productivity, And Food Security

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  • Wiebe, Keith D.
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    Abstract

    Land quality and land degradation affect agricultural productivity, but quantifying these relationships has been difficult. Data are limited, and impacts are sensitive to the choices that farmers make. Summarizing new research by economists, soil scientists, and geographers, this report explores the extent to which land quality and land degradation affect agricultural productivity, how farmers' responses to land degradation are influenced by economic, environmental, and institutional factors, and whether land degradation poses a threat to productivity growth and food security. Results suggest that land degradation does not threaten food security at the global scale, but does pose problems in areas where soils are fragile, property rights are insecure, and farmers have limited access to information and markets.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/34073
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Agricultural Economics Reports with number 34073.

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    Date of creation: 2003
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ags:uerser:34073

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    Related research

    Keywords: Land quality; land degradation; soil erosion; agricultural productivity; food security; Food Security and Poverty; Land Economics/Use; Productivity Analysis;

    References

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    1. Lau, Lawrence J. & Yotopoulos, Pan A., 1989. "The meta-production function approach to technological change in world agriculture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 241-269, October.
    2. Mundlak, Yair & Larson, Don & Butzer, Ritz, 1997. "The determinants of agricultural production : a cross-country analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1827, The World Bank.
    3. Pinstrup-Andersen, Per & Pandya-Lorch, Rajul & Rosegrant, Mark W., 1999. "World food prospects," Food policy reports 9, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Peterson, Willis L., 1987. "International Land Quality Indexes," Staff Papers 13877, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    5. Frisvold, George & Ingram, Kevin, 1995. "Sources of agricultural productivity growth and stagnation in sub-Saharan Africa," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 51-61, October.
    6. Stefano Pagiola, 1996. "Price policy and returns to soil conservation in semi-arid Kenya," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 8(3), pages 225-271, October.
    7. Lilyan E. Fulginiti & Richard K. Perrin, 1992. "Prices and Productivity in Agriculture," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 93-gatt2, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    8. Alston, Julian M. & Pardey, Philip G. & Taylor, Michael J., 2001. "Agricultural science policy," Food policy statements 32, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Wiebe, Keith D. & Soule, Meredith J. & Narrod, Clare A. & Breneman, Vincent E., 2000. "Resource Quality And Agricultural Productivity: A Multi-Country Comparison," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21723, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Kazianga, Harounan & Masters, William A., 2002. "Investing in soils: field bunds and microcatchments in Burkina Faso," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(03), pages 571-591, July.
    11. Shiferaw, Bekele & Holden, Stein, 1999. "Soil Erosion and Smallholders' Conservation Decisions in the Highlands of Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 739-752, April.
    12. Rosen, Stacey L. & Wiebe, Keith D., 2001. "Resource Quality, Agricultural Productivity, And Food Security," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20737, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    13. Peter H. Lindert, 2000. "Shifting Ground: The Changing Agricultural Soils of China and Indonesia," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262122278, December.
    14. Henao, Julio & Baanante, Carlos A., 1999. "Nutrient depletion in the agricultural soils of Africa:," 2020 vision briefs 62, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    15. Renan U. Goetz, 1997. "Diversification in Agricultural Production: A Dynamic Model of Optimal Cropping to Manage Soil Erosion," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(2), pages 341-356.
    16. Stefano Pagiola, 2004. "Environmental and Natural Resource Degradation in Intensive Agriculture in Bangladesh," Others 0405008, EconWPA.
    17. Heimlich, Ralph E., 1989. "Productivity of Highly Erodible Cropland," Journal of Agricultural Economics Research, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, issue 3.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. Noble, Andrew, 2012. "The slumbering giant: land and water degradation," Conference Proceedings 2012 152413, Crawford Fund.
    2. Nkonya, Ephraim & Gicheru, Patrick & Woelcke, Johannes & Okoba, Barrack & Kilambya, Daniel & Gachimbi, Louis N., 2008. "On-site and off-Site long-term economic impacts of soil fertility management practices: The case of maize-based cropping systems in Kenya," IFPRI discussion papers 778, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Gicheru, Patrick & Woelcke, Johannes & Okoba, Barrack & Kilambya, Daniel & Gachimbi, Louis, 2006. "Out of Site out of Mind: Quantifying the Long-term Off-site economic Impacts of Land Degradation in Kenya," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21344, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Sipilainen, Timo & Kuosmanen, Timo & Kumbhakar, Subal C., 2008. "Measuring productivity differentials – An application to milk production in Nordic countries," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 44277, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Ujjayant Chakravorty & Marie-Hélène Hubert & Michel Moreaux & Linda Nøstbakken, 2012. "Do Biofuel Mandates Raise Food Prices?," Economics Working Paper Archive (University of Rennes 1 & University of Caen) 201214, Center for Research in Economics and Management (CREM), University of Rennes 1, University of Caen and CNRS.

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