Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Productivity of Highly Erodible Cropland

Contents:

Author Info

  • Heimlich, Ralph E.
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The notion that highly erodible soils are uniformly unproductive is not supported by empirical evidence. Thus, the presumption that the cost of conservation programs targeted at highly erodible land will be low is erroneous. Average net crop revenue on nonirrigated highly erodible cropland is less than on nonerodible land, but the productivity distributions across these erodibility classes are nearly equal. Significant acreages with all but the highest productivity can be found at all levels of erodibility. Retiring highly erodible, physically marginal cropland is not synonymous with retiring less productive, economically marginal cropland.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/138801
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its journal Journal of Agricultural Economics Research.

    Volume (Year): (1989)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages:

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:ags:uersja:138801

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 1400 Independence Ave.,SW, Mail Stop 1800, Washington, DC 20250-1800
    Phone: 202-694-5050
    Fax: 202-694-5700
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.ers.usda.gov/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: soil productivity; soil erodibility; soil erosion policy; US cropland; Crop Production/Industries; Production Economics;

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Lynch, Sarah, 1994. "Designing Green Support Programs," Policy Studies Program Reports, Henry A. Wallace Institute for Alternative Agriculture, number 134111.
    2. Heimlich, Ralph E. & Claassen, Roger, 1998. "Agricultural Conservation Policy At A Crossroads," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 27(1), April.
    3. Ernst Lutz, 1992. "Agricultural trade liberalization, price changes, and environmental effects," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 2(1), pages 79-89, January.
    4. Runge, C. Ford, 1994. "Designing Green Support: Incentive Compatibility And The Commodity Programs," Working Papers 14462, University of Minnesota, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy.
    5. Wiebe, Keith D., 2003. "Linking Land Quality, Agricultural Productivity, And Food Security," Agricultural Economics Reports 34073, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:uersja:138801. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.