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Terence Chai Cheng

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Personal Details

First Name: Terence
Middle Name: Chai
Last Name: Cheng
Suffix:

RePEc Short-ID: pch849

Email:
Homepage: http://www.melbourneinstitute.com/staff/tcheng/default.html
Postal Address:
Phone:

Affiliation

Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research (MIAESR)
Faculty of Business and Economics
University of Melbourne
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Homepage: http://www.melbourneinstitute.com/
Email:
Phone: +61 3 8344 2100
Fax: +61 3 8344 2111
Postal: The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010
Handle: RePEc:edi:mimelau (more details at EDIRC)

Works

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Working papers

  1. Cheng, Terence C & Powdthavee, Nattavudh & Oswald, Andrew J, 2014. "Longitudinal Evidence for a Midlife Nadir in Human Wellbeing: Results from Four Data Sets," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1037, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  2. Cheng, T. C.; & Trivedi, P. K.;, 2014. "Attrition Bias in Panel Data: A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing? A Case Study Based on the MABEL Survey," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  3. Terence Chai Cheng & Guyonne Kalb & Anthony Scott, 2013. "Public, Private or Both? Analysing Factors Influencing the Labour Supply of Medical Specialists," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n40, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  4. Stefanie Schurer & Daniel Kuehnle & Anthony Scott & Terence Chai Cheng, 2012. "One Man's Blessing, Another Woman's Curse? Family Factors and the Gender-Earnings Gap of Doctors," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n24, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  5. Chai Cheng, T., 2011. "Measuring the effects of removing subsidies for private insurance on public expenditure for health care," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 11/32, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  6. Chai Cheng, T; & Vahid, F;, 2010. "Demand for hospital care and private health insurance in a mixed publicprivate system: empirical evidence using a simultaneous equation modeling approach," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/25, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  7. Terence Chai Cheng & Anthony Scott & Sung-Hee Jeon & Guyonne Kalb & John Humphreys & Catherine Joyce, 2010. "What Factors Influence the Earnings of GPs and Medical Specialists in Australia? Evidence from the MABEL Survey," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2010n12, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

Articles

  1. Terence C. Cheng & Alfons Palangkaraya & Jongsay Yong, 2014. "Hospital utilization in mixed public--private system: evidence from Australian hospital data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(8), pages 859-870, March.
  2. Cheng, Terence C. & Joyce, Catherine M. & Scott, Anthony, 2013. "An empirical analysis of public and private medical practice in Australia," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 43-51.
  3. Terence Chai Cheng & Anthony Scott & Sung‐Hee Jeon & Guyonne Kalb & John Humphreys & Catherine Joyce, 2012. "What Factors Influence The Earnings Of General Practitioners And Medical Specialists? Evidence From The Medicine In Australia: Balancing Employment And Life Survey," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(11), pages 1300-1317, November.
  4. Wenda Yan & Terence Chai Cheng & Anthony Scott & Catherine M. Joyce & John Humphreys & Guyonne Kalb & Anne Leahy, 2011. "Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL)," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 44(1), pages 102-112, 03.

NEP Fields

11 papers by this author were announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2014-04-29
  2. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (1) 2012-03-14
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2012-12-10 2014-02-21
  4. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (3) 2014-02-15 2014-02-21 2014-04-29. Author is listed
  5. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (7) 2010-08-06 2011-01-03 2011-10-01 2012-03-14 2012-12-10 2013-12-06 2013-12-15. Author is listed
  6. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (3) 2011-01-03 2011-10-01 2012-03-14. Author is listed
  7. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2010-08-06 2012-12-10 2013-12-06. Author is listed
  8. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2012-12-10 2013-12-06
  9. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (4) 2012-12-10 2014-02-15 2014-02-21 2014-04-29. Author is listed
  10. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2013-12-06
  11. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2014-02-15

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